Social Power Essay

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Our senses are a part of us, however we are not always consciously aware of all of our senses at every moment. Moreover, our senses, can guide our behaviors and actions, even those senses we are consciously aware of. For example, a person who received a positive comment, earlier might be compelled to donate to an organization few hours later. That individual might have done this action because his/her mood was affected by the compliment, but that individual might not exactly be aware of that. Psychologists have been able to replicate this phenomenon to induce different types of feeling or senses without the individual 's full awareness. This is known as priming. Researchers have been able to prime individuals with a sense of power, and examine …show more content…
Consequently social power was defined as the capacity to influence and control others behaviors’. Galinsky, Gruenfeld, & Magee (2003) noted the perceived social power have affects individuals actions in various ways. They acknowledged that studies have showed that those perceived power experience show more positive effects, become more extraverted, and expresses more heightened awareness towards rewards and strategies of acquiring rewards, have decreases awareness to threat, are less able to regulate behavior pertaining to social norms, and show wide range of behaviors. It was noted that perceived power allows individuals to increasingly expresses underlying personalities and feelings than those with less perceived power. Galinsky, Gruenfeld, & Magee (2003) noted that studies have shown that the effects of perceived power are contradictory, while some note that power have positive affects other show perceived power have negative effects. They noted of a study that showed those with most power (individuals with supreme justice and chief justice) tend to have narrow thinking about policy option than those with less power. They explained that those with less power tend to have think through the pros and cons and overall tend to have more doubt and are less likely to act. On the other hand power provides individuals the mechanisms to reduce deliberations, increase heuristic thinking and enhance motivation for taking

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