The Importance Of Single-Sex Education

900 Words 4 Pages
An intelligent young boy receives low grades, fidgets, falls asleep in class, and does not complete his homework. A sport scholarship-awarded teenage girl has missed the last 3 team practices and faces being benched for the next game. Because the teaching methods aren’t conducive to his learning, the young boy’s intelligence is not transferred to his work, and his attention cannot be held. Instead of attending mandatory practices for a sport the teenage girl has worked so hard for, she is being distracted by a boy and not taking her scholarship as seriously. How can we help these students make strides in overcoming these obstacles and fulfill their educational potential? Single-sex education was common in the United States, but by the end …show more content…
Research discovered girls generally use more cortical areas of the brain for verbal and emotional functioning. While boys tend to use those same areas for spatial and mechanical functioning (Gurian and Stevens). This information concludes girls learn easier with discussions and diagrams, and boys learn more efficiently by physically doing things. Because of these vast differences, scientists conducted a study to see if separating boys and girls in a school environment affected their …show more content…
Currently, girls are being taught their bodies are a distraction to boys. This has caused much controversy in society; some agree, but most think putting the blame on girls for a boy being distracted is ridiculous. This is just one of the many struggles girls face when sharing their school and classrooms with boys. This example shows the pressure put on girls in the classroom setting. Separating boys and girls could eliminate this pressure and make learning stress free. The change to single-sex classes would not only benefit females. Boys at single-sex schools are beginning to demolish current gender roles. At all-boy schools, boys feel free to pursue their interests even if the interest in question would normally be something “a girl would do.” Historian Steven Millies explains how attending a single-sex high school helped him reach his potential. "I began high school more shy than most adolescence," he recalls. "But I did take the enormous step of joining the speech team, and that opened a new world to me… I cannot imagine that I would have joined the team in a coed school. Even leaving shyness out of the question, it would have been a 'girls ' thing. ' Knowing the southside of Chicago as I do, I have to believe that any boy who joined the team would have been making himself a target." Most boys only pursue their interests in music, arts, and dramas after being enrolled in a single-sex school. With

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