The Importance Of Silence In Huckleberry Finn

Silence is virtually inescapable. Where some avoid it, others thrive in the solitude the world brings. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn written by Mark Twain, the reader finds that Huckleberry Finn, who narrates the story, both enjoying and suffering within the silence. Though as Forrest G. Robinson argues in his The Silences in Huckleberry Finn the reasons behind Huck 's depression and wish of death couldn 't only be from Huck 's circumstances alone. Huckleberry Finn 's wish for eternal solitude and his depression stem not only from his circumstances but from his author Mark Twain as well. Mark Twain throughout his work in Huckleberry Finn show similarities in events in his personal life. As Robinson states, “[Smith] draws …show more content…
Jim being the slave that runs away down the river with Huck. Caught between a societal view and his actual feelings for Jim is where Huck finds his troubles are kept. These issues are of importance due to the fact that these feelings are Huck 's feelings alone. As Huck gets to know Him more and more he realizes that Jim has a family and he has wants and values like any other man. Huck begins to see that they aren 't very a lot of differences between them. Though upon this Huck also battles between the fact that Jim is a runaway slave and unaccepted by most of society. This alone leads to much more trouble than Huck cares for. Unwanted trouble, like Tom, causes Huck to think of rash decisions, Huck comments, “I got a feeling so mean and so miserable I most wished I was dead”(Twain 281). Most importantly these feelings that are positive for Jim are Huck 's initial …show more content…
Much like his author Huck eals with these kinds of contradictory ideals. Huck struggles to give a sincere apology to Him for the cruel pranks Huck pulled. His contradictory ideas are formed from the way he views Jim. Ultimately from Mark Twain himself. These ideas are a result from Twain 's personal happenings. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn shows different ways of interpreting. Forrest G. Robinson argues in the article The Silences of Huckleberry Finn that the reasons for Huck Finn 's depression and his death wishes are from his author and the circumstances Huck is placed in. As stated already Huck deals with solitude in different ways. His imagination takes a hold and like a lot of people plays tricks. To argue Mark Twain was simply doing his best to make Huck a relatable character in his story. Huck 's feelings toward Him also explain why Huck would find his confusion and contradictory ideas from his author. Huck doesn 't know how to, or understand his feelings and like Robinson argues neither does Mark Twain. Thus the conclusion can be found

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