The Importance Of Sex Education In Texas

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With over 1,200 public schools in the state of Texas, all but one of them are declared independent, or immune to any form of municipal government. These schools have come to be known as independent school districts, “ISD” for short. The Bill of Rights plays a significant role in independent school districts, as the daily interaction of authoritative government figures and other individuals “is controlled in part by… [guaranteed] protections” listed under the Bill of Rights (Youth Rights 11). Ranking school districts from greatest to needs improvement, Texas has one of the most overrated school systems in the United States of America. Based on several factors such as decreased spending, lack of sex education, and other careless mishaps, the …show more content…
According to Texas Politics Today, Texas’s public school enrollment ranks in the 2nd percentile compared to other states. This alone seems to dumbfound everyone, considering right below that, it reads that graduation rates for Texas rank among the 41st percentile out of fifty states (Maxwell 33). How is it that the state of Texas manages to enroll more people than almost all the other states, but cannot manage to get those students to graduate? The issue is that the confounding factors in each individual’s home situation are not being considered. Sex education is non compulsory throughout Texas school systems, which explains why birth rates in Texas are at the 2nd percentile. Unfortunately, if things keep going astray like they are, that means that Texas schooling systems will lead to nothing but more drop-outs and, in turn, increased poverty. I feel as though it is unlawful for the state of Texas to …show more content…
A recent example of this was George Bush’s educational reform, No Child Left Behind (NCLB) of 2001. Arguably the most extensive education policy initiative over the last four decades, the NCLB Act brought test-based school accountability throughout the

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