Reflection On Inclusion Of Not Only Exceptional Students

Decent Essays
For the week 3 discussion I wasn 't aware of the requirements of having to post three separate posts on three different days early in the week and ended up made all the posts in the same day. However, I have been able to make five posts throughout the day from 1:54 am to 10:36 pm. I made my stance clear on the first post that I made, "I believe that raising students ' self-esteem should not be the teachers ' responsibility" (week 3 discussion, May 29, 1:54am) and proceeded to argue for it. I referred to the textbook in some of my posts to support my ideas. For example, the quote "It is mentioned in the text that "the greatest increase in self-esteem come when students grow more competent in areas they value" (Woolfolk, Winne & Perry, p. 57. …show more content…
For the discussion on inclusion during week 4, I helped explore how inclusion may benefit not only exceptional students, but the other students as well. For example, I brought up the point that inclusion may be" a valuable learning experience for other students to learn to respect individual differences and be patient with others" (week 4 discussion, June 3, 11:02pm), "inclusion offers the opportunity for schools to teach about equality, sympathy and empathy" (week 4 discussion, June 3, 11:27pm) and the quote from the textbook " 'they cite research showing that inclusion has no deleterious effects on the learning or behavior of students without disabilities and, in fact, enhances their understandings about disabilities and commitment to inclusion ' (p.95)" (week 4 discussion, June 3, 11:27pm). This point is later included into the position statement for our group. I contributed to the argument for the importance for exceptional students to develop social skills with their peers at school in my post stating that "Inclusion offers the opportunity for exceptional students to learn and practice socializing with peers of similar age" (week 4 discussion, June 1, 6:40pm). I also presented the idea that inclusion is an opportunity for other students to learn about acceptance and respect for people that may be different from oneself by arguing that inclusion may be a "learning experience for other students to learn to respect individual differences and be patient with others" (week 4 discussion, June 3, 11:02pm) and " 'they cite research showing that inclusion has no deleterious effects on the learning or behavior of students without disabilities and, in fact, enhances their understandings about disabilities and commitment to inclusion ' (p.95). Inclusion offers the opportunity for schools to teach about equality, sympathy

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