Segregation In Schools In The 1950's

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For the majority of our nations history we have struggled with racism and segregation. Whether it be the brutal segregation in the 1950’s or further back slavery. After the civil rights acts were created many people believed that these issues had been eradicated. However, that is not true we still face racial issues everyday whether it be in politics, the workforce, and especially schools. There are many statistics showing how black students are less likely to attend college and have a much higher dropout rate. This is due to many factors that include money, testing biases, and racially inclusive schools. All of these problems still very much plague our society and need to be addressed by government officials, parents, and schools administration. …show more content…
This is due to many different reasons. Including that fact that the majority of inner city students are minorities. These people tend to have less money than their white counterparts so they go to worse schools (O’Gorman 2010). The lack of money isolates these certain groups into different areas and blacks tend to end up in the lower class districts. However, full equality also would not be a fix to this issue because students are so accustomed to their segregated groups that even if the groups are missed students still tend to be drawn to people of their own race (Boyd 305). Therefore, the most important thing to do to fix this issue is to not integrate students but instead have better teachers and equal funding in order to give every student an equal opportunity. If you look at inner city schools you will see that they are mostly filled with black students. These students often create groups and associate themselves with people that are the same race as them (Boyd 305). When students are placed in such circumstances the chances of them becoming involved in crime or dropping out increase dramatically. Another problem is that the majority of teachers are white so students don’t trust a black teacher as much. In the United States 82% of teachers are white and a black teacher …show more content…
In the 1950’s a movement known as the white flight began. This movement was a spread of white people away from minorities due to loans on homes where the consumers would only have to pay 10% and get the rest of the house on loan in the suburbs instead of cities; in the end 98% of loans went to white people (Kruse 2013). This caused a major influx of whites to the nicer suburban areas thus trapping blacks in poorer urban areas. The problem still exists and still affects black people. They are essentially trapped in the less privileged areas making their schooling and lives in general. Where the schools are located are the main causes of segregation, they are trapped in areas with worse schools and people have much less respect for the people in these schools. The racism that we saw in the early 50’s still effects how the school system is set up today. Blacks are stuck in a very bad situation where they are not able to be successful. The areas that are mainly black have significantly higher rates of crimes and poverty (Goral 2016). As I have stated multiple times these factors make school much harder for students in these schools to find success

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