The Importance Of Rules Against Violence In Schools

2123 Words 9 Pages
Let’s consider an example. Some Muslims may interpret their scripture in such a way where they believe the fulfillment of their moral tradition requires them to do physical harm to others that will not adhere to Islam. If a Muslim student were to attempt to strike another student, school officials would stop the action for a multitude of reasons. None of these reasons (including the prevailing need to ensure the safety of students) specifically target Muslim morality, as rules against violence apply universally to all students. In the same way, conservative Christianity is not being targeted any more than other moral traditions when teachers intervene to prevent the continuation of perceived instances of bullying. Safety and civil order are …show more content…
It exists to guarantee that every student, regardless of their belief system or other aspects of their identity, will have an equal chance to engage in the process of education. If expressive liberty cannot exist in a location that does not actively promote toleration and mutual respect, then the question becomes to what extent can a school punish or outlaw a behavior without implying that the beliefs behind it are immoral? Naturally, there will be a fair amount of pushback when majoritarian beliefs on a morally significant issue are subjected to a higher standard of behavior. This is precisely what happens in the “no-fly zones” of public schools. Proponents of the old neutrality policy took the implication of guilt that came with teacher punishment of homophobic bullying with an equal amount of seriousness as opponents of the policy were concerned by teacher silence on the topic. By its nature, state support of homosexuality as expressed by teachers is a direct threat to some student’s untouched moral landscape. It takes more levels of connection to link instances of bullying to facilitating a mental state with a higher chance of future self- harm of …show more content…
Even if it were taken to be a significant contributing factor there would still need to be a multiplicity of steps between the implementation of the policy in the 90’s all the way to the final action of suicide. In fact, school officials and concerned parents couldn’t even agree on the amount of victims that were actually gay, and at most it was half. It is impossible to know for sure the exact and most compelling reasons behind the suicides. A national lens and compelling journalistic story may have pressed the issue to a premature resolution. After all, there was more than a decade of time where the policy existed with no significant opposition. Suicides only illustrate a flaw in anti-bullying policy if one believes the prevention of a specific kind of alleged bullying would have prevented suicide. Anoka-Hennepin was brought into the limelight because suicide, by itself, is an extremely alarming signal of insufficient mental health resources. Instead of preventing alleged bullying that may have been a contributing factor to suicide at the cost of involving teachers in a moral issue that should be left to families to resolve, schools should take limited resources directly at the source. Prevent suicide and engage in further exploration of the epidemics’ causes before

Related Documents