The Importance Of Romanticism In Tintern Abbey

775 Words 4 Pages
At birth, no memories exist, only a blank slate to build upon that quickly forms into a foundation of intricate patterns, connections, and ideas each linking to sources of experience. The same experiences lead to knowledge of love and hate or science and nature thus creating memories of a lifetime, all built upon nothing. Wordsworth describes the life of nature and man as a “living soul” imprinted deep within each being to live out forever through memories in “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” (48). Wordsworth entices the readers of the Romanticism era in “Tintern Abbey” to embrace a new sense of conscious intuition rather than reason. The Romantic poem addresses the inevitable mortality of society juxtaposed with experiences …show more content…
Regardless of how long it has been since that memory of enjoyment, passion, or a simple trivial task, instances of self-identity reveal at opportune places or times throughout life. “Tintern Abbey” insinuates self-reflection in the “forms of beauty” at “hours of weariness, sensations sweet, / Felt in the blood” (25-31). When feeling the lowest of low or highest of high, a previous experience illuminates and presses “through the woods” to find a “spirit turned to thee” (59-60). Everyone experiences hardships throughout life and at those pivotal occurrences, it is important to reflect on how experience has shaped and formed the present to handle the task laid in front of them. Wordsworth uses the Tintern Abbey as a reflection point in his life to look back upon in hardship. Nature has stayed constant and true from the first time he saw it until the present and brings him pleasure to know the same memory will bring life and hope “for future years” …show more content…
The final stanza of “Tintern Abbey” turns to when the narrator knows time is limited and reflects to his experience with nature as his “dearest Friend” (119). Only memories of joy remain that he hold beloved “Knowing that Nature never did betray / The heart that loved” (125-126). The constant nature never turned her back on the narrator. Whenever he was in doubt or trouble, nature was there. Now his time of blessings ends while “the moon / Shine on thee in thy solitary walk” regardless of “Solitude, or fear, or pain or grief” “thy memory be as a dwelling-place” (137-138,147). A life of experiences has led to this point, but instead of fearing the morality of life, the narrator embraces the journey spent with nature. Nature and the narrator embrace as one constant throughout time; one remains steady just as before and although the morality is unyielding, the other remains steady through memories of others until their turn to embrace the same

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