The Importance Of Righteousness In Society

1333 Words 6 Pages
People all around us constantly tell us to do the right thing almost everyday. Novels, comics, television shows, and radio shows always provide us with model characters who fight for justice and equality, and assume the role of the “hero.” Religion specifies rules for us to follow, and has us worship divine figures who are portrayed as kind to everybody and everything. Nevertheless, we should be asking ourselves what the definition of righteousness really is. First of all, when our species first appeared on Earth, we were completely animal-like, killing anyone and anything that came our way. We additionally indulged in taboos such as bestiality, pedophilia, and incest very frequently, and with no compunction whatsoever. We were the greatest …show more content…
Too long have we been deprived of the freedom to decide to make our own decisions, and too long have we been unable to develop our own philosophies on life. Ergo, it is time to gain that freedom back. Only then can we reach our full potential, given that it has been shown time and time again how defying rules has led us to reaching new goals we never thought were possible to begin with. First of all, look to the American Revolutionary War, for example. We broke the rules of war during this time period by introducing a new type of soldier: the sniper. Specifically, we developed long range muskets that can be fired from long distances so that we can assassinate British army officers from afar, and without ever being discovered. By doing this, we threw the British army into disarray, resulting in a less organized army that was much easier to combat, as the British army was only trained for conventional warfare, never guerrilla warfare. In the end, to guarantee a victory, one must commit many “unethical” deeds at times, especially under these circumstances. The “right” thing does not always achieve the desired …show more content…
Although the act of splitting an atom was first discovered in Germany in 1938, the United States was the first to weaponize this method in the form of two bombs: Fat Man and Little Boy. Hundreds of thousands of people perished on the days of the bombings, yet, President Harry S. Truman (the president of the United States from the latter half of World War II and onward.) understood that, had the Japanese Imperial Army continue refusing to surrender, World War II would have lasted for a much longer time, resulting in a higher number of casualties, as much of the Japanese population was prepared to fight to their last breath. Overall, this is a strong indication of how murder will have to be perpetrated in order to save the lives of the greatest number of

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