The Importance Of Respect And The Neginability Of Humanity

924 Words 4 Pages
Respect is a widely used term to describe the positive behaviour from one person to another. Having respect is a common denominator of good social relations. However, being respectful forms a basic relationship between individuals as stated by (Anderson, 1999; Lawrence-Lightfoot, 1999; Bourgois, 2002; Colwell, 2007; Honneth, 2007; Wolf, 2008), (cited by Schimer et al, 2013). Recent theory has connected having respect with being caring and supportive and states that fundamental equality is at the core of a mutually respectful relationship as stated by (Lawrence-Lightfoot, 1999; Honneth, 2007; Sennett, 2004), (cited by Schimer et al, 2013). An important aspect of respect, is respecting an individual’s capacity to act independently and make their …show more content…
Literature supports that humankind is vulnerable. Therefore, vulnerability is something that cannot be escaped as every human being is exposed to the risk of their physical or mental integrity being damaged. By taking human vulnerability into account, it is being acknowledged that we may not always have the ability or the means to protect ourselves, our health or our well-being. Certain individuals, groups and situations require greater attention and protection. For example, elderly people may be more vulnerable due to reduced physical or mental capabilities. Disabled persons may require help to exercise their self-determination and people with mental disorders may not be able to defend themselves or claim their rights as stated by (The International Bioethics Committee (IBC) of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), …show more content…
Disability may involve physical or cognitive limitation such as various chronic diseases, and others inability to speak or walk”. As stated by (Canguilhem, 1991; Kasnitz & Shuttleworth, 2001; Shuttleworth & Kasnitz, 2004), (cited in Ginsburg and Rapp, 2013) disability is a category that has created a contrast between how different cultures view the idea of normality. Additionally, as stated by (Shapiro, 1993; Charlton, 1998), (cited in Ginsburg and Rapp, 2013) how different sociocultural settings view impairment is highly variable. Shakespeare, 1998, (cited in Ginsburg and Rapp, 2013) states that the stigma surrounding disability has been the subject of critical examination by disability activists and scholars and recently the paradigm of the social model has

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