Person Centred Care Essay

1920 Words 8 Pages
With duties commonly encroaching upon personal life quality, carers are one service user group who would significantly benefit from informative information explaining rights. Aldbridge and Hughes (2016) report 1.2 million informal carers experience poverty because the demands of caring restricts working. Social and emotional support are key to overcoming pressures as stronger caring situations, like devoted and supportive mother/daughter, usually help each other achieve better outcomes (Reblin and Uchino, 2008). On the other hand, strained relationships with mixed emotions potentially fosters substandard caring and imposed risk towards vulnerable adults, who if blamed for a predicament, fall upon the mercy of carers (ADASS, 2011). Resentful …show more content…
Therefore, as the ‘owner’, care plans must feature the service user at the core, be personalised to suit individuality, show the person as an active participant, as much as possible, plus demonstrate their voice with views, wishes, feelings, and beliefs echoing throughout. Person-centred care planning involves working with adults, treating them with respect and dignity, and listening and acting upon individual decisions (Nice, 2011). Faulkner and Sweeney (2014) mentions older people find supported decision-making beneficial to safeguard themselves, but at the same time they should be empowered to gain confidence to make independent and balanced-risk choices, consistent with their fundamental rights. Subsequently, Personal Budgets specify and allocate costings for an array of available options to meet specific needs, from respite to home care (Care Act, 2014:C23:P1:S8). Likewise, for those deemed capable of managing, requested ‘Direct Payments’ enable service users to arrange and secure support that is right for them (Care Act, …show more content…
Based on professional judgment, decisions are dependent upon detailed referrals giving a clear account of concerns, yet is it probable cases ‘slip through the net’ through vital particulars being unknown, omitted or of poor quality (McNichol and Carter, 2016). To reduce missed opportunities, Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hubs (MASH) - collaboration of agencies like police and Health - work together and share information to keep people safer. However, the Steven Hoskin’s Serious Case Review highlighting Paramedics’ failure to disclose ‘alerts’ that were assumed to be common knowledge, demonstrates typical barriers of information-sharing (Flynn, 2007). Likewise, with no linked computer system cooperation is paramount, yet countless professionals misunderstand the Data Protection Act so are apprehensive divulging any confidential information (HO,

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