Religious Beliefs In Ancient Rome

Good Essays
In the years after the death of Christ, religious beliefs such as Bantu, Christianity, and Islamic faith became the center of the civilizations Africa. In the lower regions of Africa, the Bantu tribes based their religious beliefs and lifestyles off of the environment that surrounded them. These tribes where located in Torrid Zones that made it hard to create a settlement for them to live in, making them pastoralist. In the upper regions of Africa, particularly in the North, the Romans used their religious belief to create a central government that would bring the church and State together. Allowing them to expand and control regions through military force and taxation. The Islamic belief system, which consisted of society that called themselves …show more content…
This takeover came about through taxation and complete governmental power, causing the Egyptian Kingdom to lose all their power and fall under the Romans as low life peasants/servers. Before the fall of the kingdom, Egypt was known as a huge source for healthy living and tremendous trade due to the fertile land along the Nile. Making the takeover for Rome a crucial part of their survival as a civilization. Still there was a red flag on how to impose their power over such a vast amount of land and be able to control it …show more content…
This religion, in the Romans eyes, was a way to establish a hierarchical order among the kingdom by setting in a chain of command. Through this new chain of command and religion, the ruling class of Catholics, which was established by Emperors/Caesars and bishops, decided that this religion needed a base structure to fall under bringing about the Church and State. They believed that the Church and State was established by God and mutually reinforced Christian morality. With an established base of power, the lower status peasants began to see the Church and State as a divine order they must follow and guidelines that must be upheld, meaning that the ruling class of Rome had gained the control they desired in Northern Africa and eventually began expanding their power over all of Northern Africa, which included: Carthage, Mauritania, and Numidia. Showing a rapid spread of the religion and the power of the State. Within this kind of power, the ruling class still wanted to have complete control over the peasants and make sure that everything they did was for the Church/State. Eventually giving the Romans a chance to rebirth the tax system in order to renew the support for state religion and in return will renew the unity and vitality of the empire. For the longest time this is how the Romans maintained their power and strived throughout sometime by

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    How King James perceived himself as a god on earth, that was how he was treated among his subjects. He received a special favors, and was looked upon as the head of the Catholic church. Knowing of his high faith in the religion he made it obligated for the citizens of his nation to convert. Which must’ve been successful knowing he has a version of the bible named after him. To summarize this piece, Absolutism was the more effective government during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.…

    • 852 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The believed it was their moral duty to free and liberate indigenous races from savagery, consequently civilize them and instill Christian beliefs in them. Geopolitically, with the spread of colonization in Africa and Asia, the United States believed that it risked losing out of global power ranks if it did not expand like the European powers (Schultz…

    • 2094 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Society of Jesus or the Jesuit Order was founded by Spanish nobleman Ignatius Loyola, who claimed that we could shape our behaviour through severe discipline and regular spiritual practices (Haberman and Shubert). They were recognized as a religious order in 1548. The Vatican trusted the Jesuits because of the importance they placed on the development of the Church and liturgy (Conrad). They were sent to parts of Europe that were won by Protestants and the Americas as Catholic soldiers. The Jesuits established Christian churches in India, Japan, and China promoting their allegiance to church doctrine (Salem Press Encyclopedia).…

    • 1133 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    From the vast and widespread popularity of the Church, the beliefs and values became integrated into Middle Aged European life after the use of the church’s artistic depictions. The Roman Catholic Church essentially advertised itself by using art as a method of teaching morals and values, but to also keep art pieces as a reminder of how to live life. Through this method of assimilation into society, the The Church had assumed dominant power throughout most of Europe, and soon became the leading power during the Middle…

    • 1031 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    What was the role of the Catholic Church and religion in medieval life? Which institutions and events were the most significant? Why? The Catholic Church and religion dominated the lives of people of the medieval period because they had staunch believe that God, heaven and Hell all existed staunch. In the medieval age, the fall of Rome resulted in the church growth in power as they took the role of leadership and the distribution of food to the needed.…

    • 1706 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Theodosius the Great conveys the problem with Ancient Rome perfectly when he says that it may seem like the people of that century were happy, but they were not. It was almost impossible for people to be happy under the reign of monsters such as Augustus or Trajan. Theodosius makes the statement that when there are more slaves than free men, when the majority of women were oppressed, when a man was unable to be with his wife, when the only time the mind was able to escape was during a sporting event, that life itself became a burden. Ignoring the problems of citizens, the government continued to push for expansion. As the empire grew it became overstretched and could not be controlled by one central government.…

    • 1314 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Jesuits were the only people that were capable of converting Protestant regions back and reinforcing the faith of the Europeans who fluctuate in their loyalty to the Catholic Church. Ignatius felt that it was a christian's responsibility to defend their religion, no matter the circumstances because the world of Christians were experiencing blockages throughout the society. The order of the Jesuits mission was to expand their works through other parts of the world. Attempting to compensate for the turmoil created in Europe. As Jesuits began their missions, it was about ⅓ of Europe that was considering Protestantism.…

    • 963 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Religion In The 1500s

    • 2008 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Tyndale notes about how he thinks society should sweep away the powers of the earthly church and get back to people worshipping god. These writings had swayed King Henry to think. Congregating his parliament to: The Act of Supremacy (1534). He then for the first time in history spilt the Church of England from The Roman Catholic Church. This all came from King Henrys journey through parliament to sway them to allow Henry to become the head of the English Church because they like Tyndale didn’t trust the power of the Roman Catholic Church.…

    • 2008 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    African Mission Trip

    • 1103 Words
    • 5 Pages

    One of the major changing points for not just Africa, but for the world as a whole, were the world wars. The two World Wars contributed a new rise of cultural pride causing missionaries to loose control. As the wars progressed, many new African churches started popping up. Numerous, included a blend of both African and Christian religions. This “charismatic religiosity provided a survival technique for Africans in the midst of the disquiet of those years and stamped African Christianity with an identity that contested missionary control and its monopoly of Christian expression.” Missionary forces were exhausted, and instead a new self- identity started forming in the hearts of Africans around the continent (Kalu 782-787).…

    • 1103 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Chiefdoms Case Study

    • 941 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The chiefs in the Chiefdom served as a political leader whose role was "to have been established by a supernatural power. (Nowak, Laird 2010)” This “ranked society” or theocracies (Nowak, Laird 2010) was limited to the class and gender in the society and was restricted to males. Once Christianity came in, women became ordained, the use of lay people, affected the status of the chiefs. They were no longer special on a religious front and began to convert to…

    • 941 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics