Recidivism Vs Rehabilitation

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Do rehabilitation programs work when it comes to prisoners? Could it be possible that we can mold a violent offender into a productive member of society? This paper offers insight to the criminal justice policy when it comes to successful rehabilitation programs in the United States and how it benefits prisoners once they are released. The main goal of developing successful rehab programs in prisons are to prevent recidivism in inmates. Statistics found that 37% of people who participate in these programs did not return to prison within the first three years. Some prisons offer inmates many programs to try to get them back on track. With these resources come people who try to help the inmates as well like counselors and volunteers who hold …show more content…
prisons exist to mold inmates back into society when they are released. The overall agenda is that upon a prisoner’s release, they will have a better opportunity of reentering society and functioning without a repeat of criminal behavior in the future. Some prisons offer programs to inmates that can assist in this process and reduce recidivism rates in inmates. Recidivism is when an inmate returns to prison or jail for the same crime as before. According to crimeinamerica.org, 33% of inmates who did not complete any rehabilitation programs in prison went back for the same crimes as before. These rehabilitation programs include work, transitional, spiritual, recreational, and educational programs. Work programs are an important step to a former prisoners road to rehabilitation. Work programs are offered to inmates to help them gain experience and learn responsibilities. It can help them gain skills that they can use on the outside when it comes to finding a job. Inmates are offered jobs inside and outside prisons. Outside jobs include cleaning state highways,
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Inmates turn to spiritual beliefs while they are incarcerated because they feel they need to find or found something to believe in that can change their lives. Spiritual programs are programs that are developed to give inmates the opportunity to practice religion. They claim to find peace and sanctuary in a belief system as well as sharing something in common with others. Inmates are free to practice any religions such as Christianity, Buddhism, and Islam. They are also free to practice any actions associated with their own religions as long as it follows the prisons rules and safety. According to Chaplains are hired to minister and supervise spiritual groups. Community organizations and leaders from certain churches volunteer their time to provide worship services and spiritual practices required within an inmate’s faith such as ritual prayers and sacraments. Religion can be an important part of an inmates rehabilitation process because it gives them something to have faith in that they can carry with them for a long

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