The Importance Of Rape In College

1222 Words 5 Pages
Rape culture in college has come to the center of headlines in the last few years. Particularly, rape has been highlighted at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, where a girl was raped, reported it, and then the administration did not conduct an appropriate investigation and at Columbia University, where a female student was raped and when action was not taken, she carried the mattress she was raped on everywhere throughout her senior year. However, at Old Dominion and SUNY Cortland, two separate fraternities displayed spray painted sheets insinuating their ability to acquire new freshman girls on campus. Such acts were condemned by the school as public uproar ensued. Society’s depiction of woman as chiefly being sexual objects, colleges inability …show more content…
However, the fact that sexual assaults are not new on college campuses and still often assaults go unreported or unpunished, is the reason why events like these at Cortland and Old Dominion still occur. Perpetuators often go unpunished (1 in 5 Sexual Assault p. 34). However, in my experience thus far in college, at least on Union’s campus, great efforts are made to avoid assaults and when they occur and are brought to the college’s attention, the perpetrator is punished. For example, the former freshman class president last year received a two-year suspension from the school for his part in three sexual assaults. Schools across the country are being compelled to take preemptive measures to curve the rape culture and I believe these measures are futile without increased regulation of alcohol. The FBI’s new definition of rape states that consent is required for any sort of penetration and alcohol inhibits an individual’s ability to consent (Victory Over Violence). Therefore, sexual assaults will continue to occur on college campuses unless further action is …show more content…
One such example is the connection between economic class and the ability to acquire sufficient female contraception. Therefore, poor women in America, prior to the Affordable Healthcare Act, lacked the ability to acquire birth control, ultimately leading to further economic depression (My Faith). With the Act, 99% of teenagers and women aged 15 to 44 have used contraception (My Faith). Women’s access is important for reasons broader than family planning, but also for dealing with “ovarian cyst, painful periods, and endometriosis,” but also it is key in career planning (My Faith). Widespread accessibility and affordability of birth control has given American women a greater economic opportunity. Furthermore, birth control can limit the number of births a mother has which in turn increases here life expectancy because as we saw in the snapshot slides, there is a direct correlation between higher birth rates and increased maternal mortality throughout the world (A Snapshot of Females Status

Related Documents