Book Analysis: A Streetcar Named Desire

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Is banning a book ever the right choice? According to James Bryce, a British historian, he says, “The worth of a book is to be measured by what you can carry away from it”. Many literary classics are being challenged because of their content and word choices despite the valuable lessons that can be learned and discussed while and after reading them. An example of one of these controversial books is A Streetcar Named Desire. Written by Tennessee Williams, this American playwright follows the story of Blanche Dubois, a seemingly pure and innocent woman, who temporarily moves in with her sister, Stella Kowalski, and Stella’s husband, Stanley Kowalski. Throughout the play, Stanley abuses his wife Stella suggesting marital rape in their relationship, …show more content…
Although rape can be a very sensitive subject to most audiences, A Streetcar Named Desire should not be banned in high schools because it allows an open discussion of many types of abuse in an individual’s everyday …show more content…
Because domestic abuse is a broad category containing physical, emotional, psychological, financial, or sexual abuse, many cases go unreported each year. A survivor of domestic violence usually will report the perpetrator due to their relationship. Because many cases of abuse occur in a relationship, the victim most likely feels that the perpetrator will ‘change’ if the crime goes unreported. According to an article titled “Domestic Violence, Children, and Toxic Stress”, “The effects of domestic violence on children include social consequences, physical consequences, and behavioral or neuroendocrine consequences” (De Jong, par. 1). If students do not learn that domestic violence can directly influence them, they may not know the action to take if the situation were to occur. Domestic violence also occurs throughout the plot of A Streetcar Named Desire. Stanley physically abuses his wife Stella while he is drunk. In the play, Eunice, Stella’s upstairs neighbor, says “‘You can’t beat on a woman an’ call’er back! She won’t come!’” (Williams, Scene 3). However, Stella eventually returns back to Stanley. Her desire for him overcomes the instability of their relationship. By reading this section of the book, students may discuss the importance of leaving an unhealthy relationship and it’s effects on them and their family. The open discussion of domestic violence may not have occurred without reading this classic

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