My Racial/Ethnic Identity

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Racial/ethnic identity can be simple to say and complicated to understand at the same time. I know I obtain a solid foundation for my racial/ethnic identity, however that foundation grows stronger each day throughout life. I would describe myself as Black/African American without any hesitation. Our text Race and Racisms describes race as a "social construct, an idea we endow with meaning through daily interactions." This idea has definitely been instilled in me specifically by my mother at an early age, to think for yourself, have an open mind, to acknowledge who I am and it 's place in society.

Certain members of my family, especially my grandmother would identify as Caribbean American. She was born in Trinidad and migrated to the United
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Race and Racisms said "the perceived race of the other person affects how we treat one another and what we expect the other person to say and do." In some ways my race was already defined for me based on my skin color, which is easily visible to the world. However, my thoughts and beliefs are not, which at times can clash with people of any race/ethnicity, who expect you to act a certain way. For me identifying as Black is important because it connects me to a long history that I do not want to see rendered invisible. Bonilla-Silva (2013) discussed the term color-blind racism as"a racial ideology which ignores or marginalizes people of color 's distinctive needs, experiences and identities." I want to live in a society that puts an end to racism and provides justice for all. Black identification associates me with a painful struggle and dignified resiliency, that I am proud to be hold on to. The African American identity is shaped through experiences of slavery, the middle passage, segregation, Jim Crow, civil rights and freedom. African Americans unlike many other ethnicities have been described in several ways such as Negro, Colored, Afro-Caribbean, Afro-American and much worse. Descendants of enslaved Africans come from a wise people, who were creators and builders of society. As I continue to gain knowledge of this narrative, it solidifies my identity as …show more content…
Identifying as African American the location factor tends to be a complex issue for me, as I or my family have never been to Africa. Africa is so large and diverse, even many people who are born and raised there do not identify as African first. They see themselves as West African, South African, Nigerian, Somalian etc., as I learned in our first exercise in class. I do understand Black people have African ancestors, that were captured from their land and sold into slavery. However, I affiliate more with where I was born Brooklyn, NY and believe it has an impact on my race/ethnicity. There is a rich and dark history that connects African Americans and New York, starting with Wall Street being the marked site for purchase and trade of enslaved Africans. Mayor Bill de Blasio in June 2015 "dedicated a memorial plaque to the untold number of human beings who were bought and sold at a Wall Street slave market and helped build New York." Rochester, NY was a northern city for Blacks escaping slavery through the Underground Railroad and the city 's population is majority African American to this day. Harlem is a social and cultural landmark for African Americans, displaying art, culture, food, and political empowerment. In the 1900s there was the Harlem Renaissance a time in American history, where Blacks were appreciated for their work in the arts and

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