Hiv Prospective Memory

1770 Words 8 Pages
The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an incurable disease that attacks part of the immune system, specifically white blood cells. The virus allows for opportunistic diseases to come into the person’s body, causing illness or even death. When HIV was originally discovered, it was considered a death sentence. However, there have been many advancements in the treatment of HIV since then and it can now be managed. In order to properly manage the disease, people with HIV need prospective memory. Prospective memory is the ability for a person to remember what tasks need to be completed in the future, including taking medications on time and going to doctor appointments. The two main types of cues for prospective memory are time-based cues that …show more content…
It was hypothesized that, compared to people without HIV, people with HIV would have lower prospective memory abilities. Two groups of participants, HIV positive and HIV negative adults, took a test that assessed their prospective memory abilities that included tasks that had different time delays before responding, tasks that required physical and verbal responses, and tasks that assessed event-based and time-based prospective memory. During the test, the participants completed distractor tasks. After the test, participants were instructed to call the examiner the next day. On the prospective memory test as a whole, as well as specifically on the event-based and time-based tasks, the HIV positive adults scored lower than the HIV negative adults. The HIV positive adults also failed to call the examiner more often than the HIV negative adults. Carey et al. concluded that people with HIV have difficulty with prospective memory because they struggle retrieving memories of the future tasks that they need to …show more content…
However, they specifically studied individuals with HAND instead of the general population of people with HIV. Adults with HAND, as well as an HIV negative control group, completed a test on prospective memory that included time-based and event-based prospective memory tasks with either short response delays of two minutes and long response delays of 15 minutes for different tasks. While completing the test, they were also completing a distractor task. They hypothesized that the participants with HAND would perform worse than the participants who were HIV negative, that the participants with HAND would perform worse on the tasks with long response delays than the tasks with short response delays, and that the long response delays would negatively impact performance on time-based tasks more so than on event-based tasks. All of the hypotheses were supported. Morgan et al. concluded that, for people with HAND, the deficiencies in prospective memory after long delays, especially for time-based tasks, causes problems for people with HAND, such as not taking medication correctly and not being able to keep a job, and that because this deficiency has been identified, compensation strategies can be put in

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