The Importance Of Poverty In Developing Countries

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The worst development outcomes are found in the countries with the majority of natural resource endowments. “There are twenty-three countries in the world that derive at least sixty percent of their exports from oil and gas and not a single one is a real democracy” (Patrick). In developing countries, an increasingly important part of economic growth is the management of natural resources. This allows governments to deliver services to their citizens and it also creates jobs (“Creating Jobs”). The problem is that these countries do not get to keep more than a small percentage of the profit because foreign countries and companies take advantage of these less economically powerful countries. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, less than ten …show more content…
Two of the eight fundamental rights of every child is the right to health and the right to food. Every child must have nutritious food, not suffer or die of starvation or malnutrition, be protected from disease and illness, and have the opportunity to grow and become healthy, happy adults (“Understanding Children’s Rights”). The lack of resources in developing countries affects day to day living worldwide and has played a huge role in the increase of poverty and decrease of personal health. The main risk to global health is hunger and malnutrition, killing more people than malaria, TB, and AIDS combined. In two years, the number of people living in poverty has increased by 100 million and the number of people who are hungry has increased by 75 million (“Hunger in a World”). Due to poverty, nearly 22,000 children die each day. They “die quietly in some of the poorest villages on earth, far removed from the scrutiny and the conscience of the world. Being meek and weak in life makes these dying multitudes even more invisible in death” …show more content…
More than 72 million children of primary education age are not in school and 759 million adults are illiterate and do not have the awareness necessary to improve both their living conditions and those of their children” (“Understanding Children’s Rights”). Education is a major problem that stems from the lack of resources that developing countries face. The money that these governments have are not spent education, because it is a low priority. Educated citizens make for a more productive economy. More people will be able to contribute back to society with a proper education. Because these countries are not proposing to change the way their education system functions and non-governmental organizations have to step in to make these necessary changes, causes friction between the government and these organizations. This is due to the implemented changes not being continued and enforced by the governments of these countries. Even though these developing nations lack resources and leadership, there are several proposed solutions and changes that should be

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