Utilitarianism And Human Conservation

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The United States has been growing in terms of population, technological advancements, food production, along with many other evolutionary aspects over the years. These enhancements have not only been growing in our country, additionally they taken over the entire planet! Human needs have become more extensive throughout time, in which companies and industries require more resources in order to be in par with the growing population. Many people have now brought up concerns that at some point, our resources may become scarce or completely depleted by a certain timeframe in the coming future. Scientists and environmentalists have brought up numerous ideas on how to keep this possibility from becoming a reality. This hasn’t been a concern …show more content…
This idea of “conserving” or “conservation” has not only been publicized in media recently, but famous environmentalists many years ago have been sounding alarms for this developing concern. Conservation (the definition from Dictionary.com) is mostly defined as: “the act of conserving; prevention of injury, decay, waste, or loss; preservation” or the “official supervision of rivers, forests, and other natural resources in order to preserve and protect them through prudent management”. So, if humans were to conserve as population growth were to grow exponentially, could we save the planet and not deplete all of our resources rapidly? In my opinion, I stand for more on the lines of utilitarianism. With that being said, if we do indeed conserve what we use, we can help the planet one step at a time with the resources and materials that we consume on an …show more content…
Thomas Malthus, often known as the “dark cleric”, published an essay in 1798 called An Essay on the Principle of Population. He was definitely more viewed towards conservation and had worried that with a growing population over time, the food supply would not be able to support such growth. Family sizes were also a concern for Malthus. He summarizes that families with over two children would help aid in the exploding population. People would go poor, and there wouldn’t be enough food to feed a hungry nation. Overall, Malthus states that if the food supply continues to grow linearly and the population growth grows exponentially, the two lines will eventually intersect. When these lines intersect, this is where the concern takes place. The population growth will eventually become so high that the planet will only be able to supply food to the wealthy. Many often debated Malthus; these people were called the Cornucopians. They argued that rising population and a demand of things will result not environmental degradation, but in increased efficiency and technological solutions. Another idea, called the Demographic Transition Model, debated Malthus in reference to death/birth rates and how they would affect the population growth. “The Demographic Transition Model (DTM) is based on historical population trends of two demographic characteristics – birth rate and death rate

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