The Importance Of Playing God In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Don't play God, or your reckless actions will catch up to you in the long run. It doesn't matter if your actions were intentional or not, you will receive major repercussions. The gothic novel Frankenstein, is narrative on the life of a scientist whose fatal flaw ended up costing the lives of his loved ones. Mary Shelley warns the reader by constructing relevant themes around the idea of playing God.
Mary Shelley characterizes Victor's hate for his own creation by narrating his initial reaction to his monster coming to life. This is true because as the monster was rising, the narrator stated that he was so disgusted with his creation, that he ran away from it. In Frankenstein, it was evident that Victor had mixed feelings about his creation.
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This is true because in the passage, Victor stated how he feels bad for "inflicting this curse upon everlasting generations" After learning firsthand the level of destruction that this one organism can inflict upon a person, Victor also states that creating the monster was a fatal mistake when he says that he has "before been moved by the dolphins of the being I had creating... But for now, for the first time, the wickedness of my promise burst upon me"(Shelley 147). This evidence suggests that after feeling the pain and agony this monster inflicted on him, Victor finally realizes that he has, in a way, cursed everyone that is close to him and everyone that somehow crosses the path of this …show more content…
This is true because for the first time, instead of running away and hiding from his creation, Victor puts his monster's feelings into consideration and listens to his life story. This becomes evident after victor is confronted by his creation at the valley. Instead of avoiding his problems, Victor decided to take responsibility for his actions because he "felt what the duties of a creator towards his creation were and [he] ought to render him happy before [he] complained of his wickedness" (Shelley 91). In other words, Victor believed it was right to put other factors into consideration instead of only thinking about his own want, needs, and problems. This instance of characterization displays how Victor has, in a way, matured since the start of the novel. If Victor didn’t display any maturity in this situation, the reader wouldn’t be able to find out how the monster thinks of itself, which brings me to my next

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