The Importance Of Overconfidence

1229 Words 5 Pages
In this considerate and expanding your thinking book, Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic observes, "The key distinction between people who lack confidence and those who don 't is that the former are unable (or unwilling) to distort reality in their favor. The successful distortion of reality is the chief underlying reason so many people do not experience low confidence when they should. Whereas, pessimism leads to realism, optimism promotes the fabrication of alternative realities -- lying, not to others, but to themselves." For most of us, Chamorro-Premuzic asserts that we should not aspire to have high confidence, but to have high competence. If we focus on achievement, it will increase self-confidence naturally diminishing low self-esteem, insecurity, …show more content…
Why? For two reasons: first, others perceive those whose confidence is higher than their competence negative. Secondly, thinking that you are better than you actually are prevents you from making improvements. Combined, these two effects of overconfidence is a recipe for failure. In contrast, someone with low confidence will seek ways to improve their competence, thereby improving their competence and, as a by-product, also raising their confidence to match their competence. The author shows how overconfidence can be a problem in business, personal relationships and health. He also very clearly exposes the lie that has been bandied about by the self-help industry that someone with confidence can accomplish whatever they want. The opposite seems to be the …show more content…
Also, in the social relations section, he actually encourages people to lie on their first date about their interests and accomplishment because the date will not remember the specifics but will instead remember broad generalities about the person and thereby leave with a better impression. It seems to begin a relationship of any sort with deliberate lying is to start off on a very wrong foot. The final rebuke is that it is sometimes hard to follow the train of thought because the author also encourages faking confidence in certain situations. This advice seems inconsistent with the main claim that overconfidence is bad. Tis is not a book for anyone struggling with clinically low levels of self-esteem. This is a book for people with slightly less than average, and above, levels of confidence. The book seems focused for business people working in highly extroverted settings where they are expected to be gregarious and confident most of the

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