The Importance Of Mutability In Frankenstein

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Mutability: Is change necessary? Mutability is a poem written by Mary Shelley. It outlines the inevitability of change. The tone of this poem is hopeful and vibrant. The diction of this poem is critical in conjunction to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Diction not only embodies mutability, but it questions the action which change can bring within humans. While Victor Frankenstein is reluctant to create a new creature, the change which he brings does not correspond with his initial goal of glory. Thus, the embodiment and acceptation of mutability through mutability costs Frankenstein and his Monster a great deal of grief. The change which he brings frightens him. Although change can bring glory, it comes at a cost, in this case the normality …show more content…
In the incipient of the text Frankenstein has an ambition to apply his scientific knowledge to create life. Creating life itself is going against the boundaries of nature. Since creation and change both go beyond the normal boundaries of humanity, boundaries that change can be a choice. In Frankenstein’s case, the change which he brought was life itself. But rather than having this glorifying discovery become successful, Frankenstein his creations plagues with fear. Frankenstein’s fear is resonated by his diction when he says, “I had desired it with an ardor that far exceeded moderation; but now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, a breathless horror and disgust filled my heart”(). He himself did not accept his creature due to his creatures countenance. The physical appearance of the Monster rendered Frankenstein’s anticipations of beauty. Through diction Frankenstein is able to convey how he feels about the change he has brought. His definition of glory is based on a physical admiration of countenance. This is both superficial but also defines what type of being Frankenstein is. He is a man who values countenance and physicality and that is displayed through his descriptions of characters who he loves, like Elizabeth. He is unable to accept the change he has created. His inability to accept consequences make others in the text suffer the …show more content…
The monster is the creature who is experiencing constant change in physical location. He is also learning new languages and encounters human beings along his journey. He passes through a village where his countenance is judged upon “…the children shrieked, and one of the women fainted”(83). The reaction of others towards the monster demonstrates the inability to accept change in society. This reaction displaces the monster in society. Since he has no other, no companion, no home, he is left to learn from humans and their experiences. The fact that he had to encounter such reactions also is the fault of Frankenstein. if he had accepted his duty as a creator to nature his creation, the reaction others would have could have been different. Rather than them judging his physical countenance, they could who he truly was. It is rather human nature that inspires such abilities to nurture those with a different appearance. But no matter the change in appearance, change has to be accepted. In Mutability Shelley exclaims “Man’s yesterday may ne’er be like his morrow”(15). Shelly underlines that a everyday even for man inhabits change. But with the Monster and his physical appearance is a difference/a change within society. Others do not accept this difference because it is physical. Victor should be given accountability for Monster. Rather

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