The In Truth Albert Camus Character Analysis

Superior Essays
Terrible tragedies impact virtuous people every day, seemingly without justification. Although these horrific occurrences have no apparent cause—these people may not have committed a wrongdoing or any otherwise immoral act to deserve such a punishment—they occur anyway, subjecting the unfortunate victims to unfair tragedy. The inability of humanity to find reason behind these unjust events relates to the philosophical school of absurdism, and in particular, the amorality of the universe, a key concept within absurdism. The universe is indifferent to all aspects of human morality and occurrences happen without discernible reason; however, these irrational events are difficult for society to accept. This notion occurs in Albert Camus’ novel The …show more content…
He is often unconcerned with any situation he is presented with, and his unpredictable actions are unaffected by society’s values, such as emotions or interpersonal relationships. This abnormal attitude is the primary cause of his condemnation. In Camus’ The Stranger, society’s tendency to interpret all situations through morality causes them to portray Meursault’s indifference as despicable, ultimately resulting in his ostracization. This idea is demonstrated through society’s misinterpretation of his character during three key deaths; first, Meursault is portrayed as immoral for his uncaring actions and lack of grief after his mother’s death. Second, Meursault’s complete indifference in response to his murder of the Arab is depicted as malicious. Finally, society is forced to plea with Meursault to embrace religion, as they cannot understand Meursault’s uncaring attitude towards his own imminent …show more content…
Meursault’s apathy towards his mother is evident through his blunt and emotionless actions, but there is no reason to believe that he is morally vile. For instance, when Meursault learns of his mother’s death through telegram, he states: “Mother died today. Or, maybe, yesterday; I can’t be sure” (Camus 4). To the majority of people, the passing of a loved one would evoke a reaction of overwhelming grief; however, Meursault’s focus is on a simple fact, not the emotional aspect of the death. This demonstrates his emotional detachment from his mother. After, instead of paying his last respects during his mother’s vigil, Meursault believes that “it didn’t seem to matter” (Camus 7). As a result, he smokes, drinks coffee, and dozes off—uncivil activities that reveal his indifference to his mother’s death. Meursault’s casual, everyday actions show that he is truly indifferent to his mother’s passing; he does not view his mother’s death in a positive or negative light, but rather, as if nothing had occurred at all. Meursault does not perform the moral action of mourning, nor perform any immoral actions like rejoicing at the death of his mother. In fact, after attending the funeral, Meursault states, “really, nothing in my life had changed”, showing his utter apathy towards her death (Camus 17). However, society’s

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