King Charles VI: The King In Plato's The Republic

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In Plato’s renowned collection of dialogues, The Republic, he uses what is known as the ‘Ship of State’ metaphor to express the qualities of a good monarch. Being that a “true pilot must of necessity pay attention to the seasons, the heavens, the stars, the winds, and everything proper to the craft if he is really to rule a ship”. This sentiment, expresses the ability that defines an apt ruler. As monarchical positions are pivotal within a kingdom, as they had the duty of maintaining or improving the integrity of the state and its people via making appropriate decisions and paying attention to its needs. Therefore, monarchs who lack the ability to fulfil these responsibilities are insufficient as rulers, and may in turn have a negative effect …show more content…
(Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d; Newworldencyclopedia.org, 2013) His reign begun at the age of 11 with the death of father, King Charles V in 1380, and ended with his own death in 1422 for a total of 42 years. (Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d) Due to the age of Charles VI being below the required age for independent rulership, his uncle, Philip the Bold was appointed regent, along with the “council of 12”. (Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d; Jervis, W., Hassall, A. and Haverfield, F, 1907) Philip was a poor regent, affected by avarice, and using his position and Charles for his own political agenda. However, by the time Charles was 19, he had still not declared an independent rule, and had to be urged by the Cardinal-bishop of Laon in order to do so. (Jervis, W., Hassall, A. and Haverfield, F, 1907) The reasoning why Charles did not do so sooner is unknown, because due to the way described, it seems he could have done it whenever it pleased him. However, it could be because of: Philip’s and the councils of 12 political power being so substantial as to be threatening to Charles, or he simply wished not to rule and was content with the responsibility being in the hands of other, among other reasons. But despite the reason, it does show that he likely did not have the capability or desire for monarchical role, even prior to the peak of insanity.

This sentiment is corroborated when analysing
…show more content…
As it was essentially a baronial revolt, over the control of the state, led by Mortimer a baron, and Edward’s own queen Isabella due to their hatred of Edward’s ‘Despensers’ or royal ‘favourites’. (Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d.) Which as aforementioned he would lavish with money, and gifts, which the barons despised, along with Edward’s own queen. But what most confirms the hatred for him, and his ‘favourites’ amongst the state and its people was that when the Baron and the Queen invaded, few sided with

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