The Importance Of Missing Women

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Most Asia countries have male-biased sex imbalance resulting in a deficit described to as missing women. In China there has been a steady increase in the number of “missing women” Qian states that “an estimated 48.4 percent of the population in China and India are female”1. Most of the missing women in the world are in India and China where it is stated there is an estimated deficit of close to seventy million women. The sex imbalance has been documented in richer Asian countries like Taiwan and South Korea. The increase of sex imbalance in these countries has been attributed to neglect of the girl child, sex-selective abortion and infanticide. Additionally, the increase in female income into the share total of the household income has been …show more content…
In 1990, 55 percent of all births following a female first born child was male which later increased to 62 percent in 2000. 49 percent of participants in the survey which was documented “were parents who had a second child following the birth of their first born girl child”2. These means that an estimated 7.7 million missing girls of the total 9.3 million were a result of the families whose first born children were girls; therefore, the sex ratio in China can be explained from the perspective of childbearing behaviour after the birth of a daughter as the first child. Although the 1.5 child policy discourages the order birth that follows the birth of a son as the first child than the births following the girl child there has been an effect on the increased fertility among couples who want to have a son may choose to take part in sex selection when in search of a male birth while reducing fertility of parents who want a daughter might encourage them to have sex selection in favour of a daughter which results in an increase in sex …show more content…
In the 1960s the missing women phenomenon was less conspicuous because there was a higher fertility rate and a lower mortality rate; therefore, mothers were more likely to have one surviving son without using the sex selection approach. Although the female deficit was reduced during this time, the population growth was unsustainable. During the 1970s, the Chinese government began promoting the two is enough policy which resulted in the sex ratio rise of the first and second-born daughter. According to Wei and Zhang “from the mid-1980s there was a steady increase in the sex imbalance and kept going higher over the next decades”

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