Rap Stereotypes

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For years, people have developed certain stereotypes for different groups, depending on the group at hand. Although the stereotype may apply to some of the group, the majority usually do not match up. Most people use stereotypes because this is the only knowledge they have about a group or even a certain individual. Sometimes, a truth about a group of people can be exaggerated. This means a certain characteristic on a group can be falsely stated, or stated with over-exaggerated meaning. This leads to misconceptions about the group, and these are usually inaccurate. Misconceptions are not based off of any facts, rather someone’s wrong-saying. Misconceptions and Stereotypes differ because misconceptions are not based off of anything, and stereotypes …show more content…
An ugly truth about rap is that most rappers are affiliated with a certain gang, and they make this clear in their songs. Despite this, rappers work tirelessly night in and night out to perfect their songs, and to some every single lyrics count. The negative stereotypes about mumble rappers or any new form of rap should not overshadow the majority of rap artists, who use their talent to write poetry in their lyrics. These types of artists should be the ones hailed as rappers because they expose the beauty of lyricism and the influence behind their message. It is important that the majority of rappers today still continue to give us audience the appropriate rap in their music. The other experimental-type rappers should be included in a different category when comparing the types. It would not be fair to compare a mumble rapper to a lyrical rapper because the style and effort are evidently different when the music is created. A lyrical rapper spends time mastering his lyrics along with a side-kick music producer that give them a beat to work with. The lyrical rapper gets creative on what to say in raps and typically uses his voice to shine light on political issues or even may tell an interesting story. A mumble rapper enters a studio usually without pre-written lyrics. They rely on the producer for an up-tempo beat and usually say a few catchy words to attract an audience. …show more content…
Yes the stereotype of rappers becoming lazy and only saying few words in songs is based off some truths, but that is only because a few rappers in the industry are experimenting with their new styles. These stereotypes should not be aimed at the genre rapping, but rather at the sub genres that have recently been created. Mumble rapping is an accurate example of one of these sub genres. Joey Bada$$ along with other artists believe that these genres need to be more thoroughly identified and recognized. The main subject of rap should be protected at all costs, and most artists today are doing this by rapping appropriately. From the pioneers of rap to now it is safely continuing its toll on the generation, and rappers today still use their lyrics for their powerful messages. Although these mumble rappers and other artist who are trying out new ideas will continue to be popular, rap will live on in its truest form. No one should perceive rapping as saying a few words while relying on a catchy beat with no purpose or meaning behind a song . They should rather understand the genre and come to understand that rapping is much more than just a “few words”. Rap is unique. Rap is creative. Rap is speaking your thoughts at its

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