Mindfulness: The Importance Of Being Mindful

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Mindfulness is the instinctive condition of our judgment: paying attention, being circumspect, non-overcritical, relaxed, and opened. Mindfulness enable us to be aware of our present moment and environment, and enables us to assimilate from our experience and gaining the strength of letting go our regrets and reflection of the past, and our worries about the future. We usher in awareness to our experience in the current moment. A research study done by (Mrazek et al., 2012) stated that ‘‘when the ability to concentrate is redirected to a challenging task, it can prevent the displacement of crucial task-relevant information by distractions’’. In particular, these studies have proven that without us being mindful as an individual …show more content…
It 's important for a therapist to be able to identify and manage responses to the issues that clients might present to them. For example when the content of the meeting intimidates us, or an exterior stress divert us, or the client gets disconnected, making his or her utterance less conclusive, or we just become exhausted. Lacking self-insight, we may attempt to keep awareness by spinning up the power or volume so as to keep the situation engaging. Through mindfulness presence as a therapist or individual, we alternatively assimilate how to turn up our awareness, thereby bringing our genuinely awareness to the moment. We begin by concentrating on the music in the room, the consciousness of our breath as we sit with our feet touching the floor. This enables us to become more open and present in our experience and that of our client, because we have become less distracted with our own issues and listen more fully. A study by (Germer et al 2005) and ( Martin 1997 ) defined ‘‘ Mindfulness as a moment-by-moment awareness or state of psychological freedom that occurs when attention remains quiet and limber, without attachment to any particular point of view’’. This study is relevant to this core value mindfulness because being mindful enhances our ability to be attentive in our everyday life as a therapist or individual and we learn to calm ourselves in demanding …show more content…
It will guide me as a therapist to practice letting go our own reflections, verdicts, and scrutinizing, and return to listening open-mindedly to the client, deeply and thoughtfully by communicating gradually enough to stay connected to our body and heart. Also it will docent the therapist from not meddling the line on self-disclosure. Furthermore, the practices am going to engage to support the improvement of this quality is the practice of mindful breathing and walking in order to recognize and to look deeply into my anger, also by practicing mindful eating, drinking, and consuming. I will practice looking deeply into how I consume the Four Kinds of Nutriments, namely edible foods, sense impressions, volition, and consciousness. And develop a five minutes of listening to music every morning before

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