The Importance Of Micronutrients In Plants

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Plants require certain substances that are necessary for their survival. These requirements are carbon dioxide, water and mineral nutrients. Mineral nutrients are essential chemical element that are critical for plants to sustain life function and complete their life cycle (Uchida, 2000). These nutrients are classified into two groups micro a macro nutrients. Micronutrients are elements are used in very small amount these include boron, chlorine, cooper, iron, manganese and zinc. While Macronutrients are nutrients that are required in large amounts, these include Potassium, phosphorous and nitrogen. Potassium is vital to plant growth as is an enzyme activator that promotes metabolism and is involved in protein synthesis (Lines-Kelly, 1992). …show more content…
Phosphorous play an important role in photosynthesis, respiration, energy storage and transfer, a plant doesn’t get the required amount it causes wilting leaves and Reduced fruit or seed production (O'HAGAN, 2016). The most important macronutrient is nitrogen, which is necessary for formation of amino acids, chlorophyll and the for synthesis of all proteins (Doubleday, n.d.). Amino acids are critical for growth and development as they form Protoplasm the site for cell division. Nitrogen is also vital to critical process such as photosynthesise because nitrogen forms chlorophyll and the protein that are synthesised are needed for the synthesis of enzymes which control all the essential processes (Doubleday, n.d.) If a plant becomes deficient in nitrogen, it cause the plant stunting due to decrease in cell division and the leaves will become yellow due to the lack of chlorophyll. Therefore it can be seen that micro and macronutrient are critical to plant …show more content…
This process is represented by the formula C6HO + 6O → 6HO +6H2O + 6CO2 + ATP. Photosynthesis and cellular respiration is an important relationship that is critical to plant life as the products of one process are the reactants of the other (Placeholder1) . Through the relationship, photosynthesis creates the glucose and the cellular respiration breaks down the glucose through Anaerobic Respiration Aerobic Respiration. Anaerobic respiration occurs in the absence of oxygen, where glycolysis breaks glucose into two pyruvate molecules. When the oxygen is still absent, two pyruvate molecules are catabolized into acetic acid and two CO2, this is called fermentation. The breakdown of the glucose is then completed through aerobic respiration. This breakdown is only completed when there is oxygen which is needed to remove carbon atoms. Through these two stages, the glucose which is made through photosynthesis is broken down into a form in which cell can

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