The Importance Of Memory And Long-Term Memory

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Most people can recall a favorite childhood memory off the top of their head. Or how just one word can trigger a significant moment in the past. Or remembering your aunt’s homemade cookie recipe. We can all know that two plus two equals four because it has been drilled into our heads since we were children. The human memory is irreplaceable and something that we rely on everyday. But how does our brains remember directions to our favorite restaurant or what our dad’s favorite color is? Where are all these memories stored and how are they categorized? And how can we recall them so quickly? Memories are stored in many different ways, different places, and for different amounts of time. The human memory is __________________________. The process …show more content…
Long-term memories must literally be built into the brain’s synapses. (notecard 7). The process of converting working memory into long-term memory is called consolidation, it is characterized by the loss of distracting information. (notecard 23). Short term recollection is translated into long-term memory in the hippocampus. (notecard 1). The hippocampus helps to solidify the pattern of connections that form a memory, but the memory itself depends on the solidity of the connections between individual brain cells. (notecard …show more content…
Neurotransmitters are proteins produced by the nervous system. To be classified as a neurotransmitter, a chemical must bridge the synapse and induce an electric current in a dendrite. Neurotransmitters may either excite the dendrite or inhibit it, and the same neurotransmitter may be excitatory or inhibitory in different neural circuits. Neurotransmitters that increase activity in the neuron are said to be excitatory. In contrast, neurotransmitters that decrease activity in the neuron are said to be inhibitory. That is, inhibition causes the neuron to make fewer action potentials rather than more. Common neurotransmitters include dopamine, acetylcholine, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and norepinephrine. GABA is the most commonly used neurotransmitter in the human brain. Acetylcholine is used by neurons that innervate and control our

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