Medical Treatment Obligations Essay

Improved Essays
Despite what many might think, a patient 's right to refuse medical treatment has a very important meaning in the lives of many. People who have medical complications must learn to work with doctors and or surgeons in hospitals. With having the right to refuse medical treatment patients feel as if they have more power over their own health and future. Even though surgeons are qualified in making medical treatment decisions, patients should have the right to refuse medical treatment options. Patients should have the right to consider all medical options based on risk factors, success and effectiveness, and their living-will.
Before patients make a fast, irrational decision, they should take the time to consider risk factors of the surgery. Enduring
…show more content…
Some medical cases are too much to handle or too complicated for a surgeon to take on and they can refuse to operate. Such as, surgeons have rejected the opportunity to operate on incapacitated ICU, or intensive care unit, patients who will surely die without the surgery. The patient would have a little increase in the chance of survival if the surgery was performed, but the surgeon refused to operate (Wicclair, White 34). In other medical cases, surgery may not be very beneficial in the first place. Researchers examined records of 1,450 patients in the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ compensation database who were known to have disc degeneration, disc herniation or radiculopathy, a nerve condition that causes tingling and weakness of limbs. Surgery was needed to fuse two or more vertebrae in hopes of curing lower back pain. Although they all had equivalent diagnoses, only half of the patients chose to have surgery performed and the remainder of the patients did not. Only twenty-six percent of those patients that had surgery, even two years later had not returned to work, which converts into a seventy-four percent rate of failure. In addition, it concludes that they have a better possibility of going back to work if they decline the surgery in the first place (Nguyen, Randolph, Talmage, Succop, Travis …show more content…
To stop undesirable medical interventions, researchers have put forward a so-called “living will” or “natural death” law. The main purpose of this law is to provide capable people with a service to set forth a document, known as a “living will”, which states what the patient does and does not want done to them medically if they become mentally incompetent (The Right to Refuse 918). Each situation is different, but in most cases, when the patient is incompetent or unable to establish their own decisions, they have the right to appoint another person to request a medical treatment decision for them (The Right to Refuse 918). Additionally, in spite that different laws vary, a common law permits patients to direct the withholding or withdrawal of medical treatment if the patient becomes incurable (The Right to Refuse 918). This is an essential document to have under any medical conditions, so that surgeons and family members do not have to guess, what the patient would and would not want done to them. As expressed, a living will can be a very important segment to a patient 's medical health and overall decision

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Charles mentions how various factors within the system of care attempts to shapes what a doctor can do for the patients but it is important for the physician to remember that “ the physicians duty of patient advocacy should not be altered by the system of health care delivery which the physician practices” (p. 198). Being carried away from an initial goal can be easy and can happen to anyone but doctors are to remain focused on providing care for every member of society. It is important to remained focused and seek the best route for the patient. Doctors who are able to provide care services are required to serve all the members of society and participate in the creation of health care policy (p. 199). Charles explains that, “ Physicians have an ethical obligation to preserve and protect the trust bestowed on them by society” (p.199) because patient place their trust on them when they are in a vulnerable moment.…

    • 1606 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    With the understanding that their patient does not want to die, the doctors should act according to their oath as physicians to provide the best possible care. There is a chance she will live, albeit in an altered state mentally and physically, if her legs are amputated. It would be unjust to allow the infection to spread thus prolonging the suffering of the patient. Although I agree with the court’s decision to amputate Mary’s legs in order to save her life, it is a decision that was not determined in a timely manner. Such decisions regarding patients with severe and deteriorating illness should be processed with respect to the patient’s condition becoming worse with time.…

    • 815 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In regards to the end of life concept, it is extremely important to follow any personal beliefs or choices that our patients have made, such as a DNR request. DNR requests are a very good example of the ethical concerns regarding the end of life concept. With a DNR request, a physician assistant (or any healthcare professional) cannot go against your beliefs if your heart stops or if you stop breathing. They have to respect your request regardless of their beliefs. Finally, the last two major points in medical care are community well being and…

    • 859 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Autonomy and Ethical Principles of Care Gunnar Kupfer Grand Canyon University HLT-305 October 16th 2016 Ethics in health care could be life or death. Patients have a lot of rights when it comes to health care, yet patients don’t even know what they are. Basic consent forms truly don’t adequately inform patients of their rights. Consent forms are written in high levels and use words most wont understand. The average person simply cannot read a Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy consent form.…

    • 1282 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    There is an ethical debate on whether a physician must disclose the risks associated with a procedure to a patient. A physician’s duty is to tell the patient all the information he or she needs in order to give informed consent for the procedure. However, if a physician believes that disclosing the risks accompanying a procedure may be harmful to a patient’s health, they are not required to divulge that information. Even though there are both pros and cons to the action stated, a physician’s job is to provide the best standard of care for the patient. In a situation in which a physician fails to disclose all the risks associated with a procedure, they must still receive consent from the patient to proceed.…

    • 703 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Arguments Against Pas

    • 1245 Words
    • 5 Pages

    By preventing clients from taking their life, healthcare providers are being paternalistic and imposing their views onto their patients” (de Vocht et al). Medical ethics lie on the base of consent of the patient, as well as discretion, judgment, and experience of the medical physician. Healthcare professionals should be able to make the judgment call to respect the patient 's wishes and put their best interest forward. “Should Doctors be Allowed” concludes that helping them to achieve a calm and peaceful end should be thought of as one of the best treatments for terminally ill patients. Overall, the patient’s wishes should be first and PAS should be legalized because this topic is a highly personal and situational decision, thus should not be deemed as unethical or illegal under…

    • 1245 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Allowing the patient to choose who they feel more comfortable seeking help from is necessary to ensure they are making the right decision. The article talks about “psychiatrists might most likely have the necessary diagnostic skills” to determine if a patient should be able to carry on with assisted suicide (Kipke, 519). This is a viable argument considering they have the training to understand a person’s mental state. This compares to a physician who is a trained medical professional that studied the anatomy and biology of how human operate. They also understand that assisted suicide is not a light, easy subject to confront and is to be taken seriously.…

    • 791 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Patient Refusal Versus Request As stated earlier, it is unethical to prolong a life when the patient is terminal and not receiving necessary treatment. However, society is not the only factor considered when it comes to treatment. A patient has the legal right to refuse treatment. According to Health Care Ethics, practical wisdom is used to determine that a patient can ethically refuse treatment. The Quill v. Vacco court case further indicated that PAS should be allowed for terminal patients.…

    • 825 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Futility is used by physicians to withdraw life support to convey a message to the surrogate of the patient. If the patient or surrogate is not properly informed of the situation before the removal of life support, physicians can be held responsible for euthanasia. Problems do arise when the surrogate(s) want to further life-sustaining treatment and the Physicians oppose it. For instant when a Physician does not want to provide treatment because it is inappropriate. The legal rule states that a malpractice test must be performed.…

    • 1304 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    It is very important in a medical field to maintain confidentiality of the patient and to take the patients permission prior to examination or even touching the patient. Hence here communication plays a major role and specifically when we are involving a third party like the interpreter it could be a huge concern for the patient. When an interpreter is trained it is mandatory for him to know and understand the medical terminology for an effective and quality care else it could be disaster. In order to avoid the interpreters are given theory and practical sessions with classes and play-roles to deal with the real situations. Another factor that is required is the awareness of the troubleshooting technical problems that provider needs to learn.…

    • 1508 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays