The Importance Of Math Education In The United States

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The achievement of American students compared to that of students in other countries shows that United States tests lower in math literacy than other countries. Findings show that Asian nations are testing higher in math and science than United States students. It is important to get parents, schools, and the community involved to keep students on track when it comes to building a strong educational system. Student motivation is very important for both the Asian and United States countries. Motivation naturally has to do with a students ' desire to participate in the learning process. High-quality teachers, proper technology, informational textbooks, and parental motivation are a necessity when it comes to helping to improve math education. …show more content…
Based on this evidence, it is obvious that Asian students’ parents take education very seriously, and make it clear that they want the very best for them. It is important to get parents, family, schools, and the community involved to keep the students on track when it comes to building a strong educational system. High-quality teachers, proper technology, informational textbooks, parental motivation, self-motivation, curriculum, remediation/studying and assessments, will help to improve math education, in the United …show more content…
Students depend on their teachers to receive the best education they can, and having a teacher who is well educated and makes learning fun is a plus. The University of California – Irvine (2007) expresses the fact, math teachers in Asian countries offer more support for their students, and that math teachers in the United States offers less support which is needed to help students learn more. This concept is likely to be the contributing factor that as to why United States students tend to score lower in performances on international math tests (Irvine, 2007). On the job training for teachers from the Asian nations of Japan, Singapore, and Hungry, when compared the United States, received the same minimal training and mentoring (Vergano, 1996). Francis “Skip” Fennell, the president of the National Council of Teacher of Mathematics, felt that this was something the federal No Child Left Behind Act meant to fix (as cited by Vergano, 1996). Fennell pointed out that, there was no funding for certain schools or state systems, so they could not hire or even train qualified teachers (as cited by Vergano, 1996). Many United States teachers are highly qualified and many of them go back to school to get their National Boards in Education to learn even more ways of teaching their students. In a speech given by President Clinton, he told the National Council of Jewish Women that he would strive to hire more

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