The Importance Of Materialism

1481 Words 6 Pages
Humanity’s awareness is attributable to a physical existence that allows him or her to hear, see, touch, smell and in general experience life. A memory bank or consciousness full of a lifetime’s dreams and desires some that came to fruition while some did not. All the while, he or she acquires knowledge during their physical journey here on earth. People are born, they live and experience their life, and then they die. Once death occurs, is a material existence all humanity has and is there nothing that survives physical death? Perhaps there is in fact a vital force or consciousness that precedes and surpasses physical life. Although materialism does not acknowledge such a claim as there is no awareness besides what the physical body …show more content…
491). Price maintains that “left to his or her resources, as he or she should be in the Other World, with nothing but their memories to depend on, they should probably be able to form only generic images of such objects” (Ibid). It would seem that their once sense-perception in a physical form would become an imaging world although not quite the same. What could potentially remain the same are their thoughts, emotions, and wishes, or the attributes that make them identifiable, which passes on to the Next-World and remains part of the entity’s consciousness (Ibid). Conversely a materialist would claim that in order to feel alive there must be a physical presence from which feelings derive. Materialism maintains and Price mentions that “feeling alive, surely, consists in having experiences of a special sort, namely organic sensations-bodily feeling of various sorts” (Peterson, et al., Philosophy of Religion, p. 492). With the absence of a body, it can be difficult to conceive of a disembodied consciousness recalling such feelings, including the feeling of physical life (Ibid). Although from a naturalistic perspective, this may be true, it can also be said that the sensations or recollections of a disembodied entity has are only similar to those once felt in a physical form, but not exact as there is the absence of a …show more content…
The only reality that is pertinent is the reality an entity resides in because there is firsthand knowledge of that existence. However, if survival after death has its basis in the images and memories of a physical reality, then both positive and negative memories would most likely shape a disembodied entity’s afterlife universe. In addition, it would also shape the appearance of the disembodied entity as well. John Hick implies that, “they will have bodies which are the outward reflection of their inner nature” as Hick refers to the resurrection of a disembodied form back to a bodily presence (Peterson, et al., Philosophy of Religion, p. 520). However, both Price and Hick do support existence as a consciousness that survives death that remembers both living and dying and where communication at least initially, for Hick would be telepathic (Peterson, et al., Philosophy of Religion, p. 495, 517). Price further acknowledges that “it is reasonable to suppose that in a disembodied state telepathy powers are constantly being inhibited by their need to adjust their self to their physical environment and that it would be the joint-product of a group of telepathically-interacting minds and public to them all (Peterson, et al., Philosophy of Religion, p. 495). Yet too for all he or she knows, the afterlife is a culmination of the dreams and wishes not sought after while in physical form in which the

Related Documents