Why Male Birth Control Exists Analysis

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While sociology has long been aware of gender as a fluid spectrum rather than two distinct categories, this idea is just beginning to make its way to the forefront of mainstream media and discussions. The way gender is perceived today is a product of stereotypes being gendered and reinforced over the course of history. Masculinity and femininity have become the two, and only, district categories of gender. At birth, a person is designated either “male” or “female,” and this label shapes the way that person is viewed by the world for the rest of their life. Femininity, referring typically to social actions carried out by female bodied people, is often categorized by traits such as passiveness, emotional sensitivity, and a nurturing disposition. …show more content…
While reading, I found it very interesting that the nonexistence of male birth control wasn’t entirely due to a lack of support or interest, but rather a lack of awareness. A 2005 study interviewed over 9,000 men across nine different countries and found that over half would be willing to use a form of birth control that was “capable of preventing sperm production” (Extance, 2006). Yet despite this apparent high number of men willing to try birth control, very few are actively seeking methods. This could be attributed to the feminization of the birth control industry. Birth control has always been marketed to the female population and it’s regarded as the woman’s responsibility. On the other hand, sexual prowess is viewed as a hyper masculine trait, and anyone dulling this prowess with birth control would risk undermining their manhood. However, when a relationship relies on only one form of birth control, namely from the woman, there is clearly a greater risk of an accidental pregnancy if her birth control were to falter. An accidental pregnancy can have a huge detrimental impact on anyone, but because younger men are generally less established, they are more likely to suffer emotional and financial distress as a …show more content…
In some cases, men may not even be aware of the damage they are inflicting upon their own mental and physical health by adhering to hegemonic masculinity. While gay men often defy hegemonic masculinity by rejecting heteronormativity, they are not free from unconsciously clinging to other aspects of masculinity. Regardless of sexuality, all men are expected to socially conform to the standards of manhood typical of their own culture and society. Many gay men may refuse to take any precautionary measures to protect themselves from contracting AIDS, because abstinence and safe sex can undermine manhood (Courtenay,

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