The Importance Of Marketing In China And China

2568 Words 11 Pages
Register to read the introduction… In China, it is important to remember that the customer prefers human interaction. Even when they make purchases online, they often prefer to see and handle the product in person and then exchange funds online only. This is partially due to thier inherent skepticism about product quality, but also because they like to get out where the people are. In practical terms, this means that it is critical for a company entering the Chinese market to develop a physical presence there. That way, the customer can interact with the company and the company can hire local workers that can interact with customers on a more personal …show more content…
It is similar to America in this regard, though that seems counter-intuitive for all of our differences in the ways we prefer our social interactions. Chinese business people want clear and informative webpages just like Americans do, though they prefer their email correspondence to be a little more personal and frequent. Chinese people are also more frequent users of social media than are Americans, so successful Internet businesses should be sure to utilize tools like Tianji and Wealink (since Twitter and Facebook are still being blocked by the government). They also prefer Internet advertisements over other kinds of "inferior media." In fact, advertising in China is a bit of a problem itself. In recent years, the Chinese government has banned advertisements for luxury items and all advertisements shown during program television. This poses a serious challenge to new companies trying to gain exposure for their products and makes them all the more likely to turn to the Internet for their marketing …show more content…
In China, the giving of gifts is often an acceptable practice because it fortifies the relationship between businesses and it is not considered unethical. In fact, it is often highly regarded. In America however, giving gifts in regard to a business transaction is considered bribery and therefore unethical. The Chinese are also more likely to consider the final outcome of an action before deciding if it is unethical or not. If a Chinese person were to violate the rules of the company but no one cared about it and no damage was done, he would be more likely to consider his action ethical than an American would. Americans are more objective in their evaluations of what is ethical and what is

Related Documents