The Importance Of Literacy In The American Sign Language

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What is Literacy? Literacy is defined as the ability to read or write. Being literate is a necessity to everyday life in America. Without the comprehension of literacy, an individual would have no skills to read, write, solve problems and access technology. Those who are deaf face a harder time learning English reading and writing, but literacy can be taught through American Sign Language (ASL). Merriam Webster Definition of ASL is “a formal language employing a system of hand gestures for communication (as by the deaf).” (Webster) The deaf or hearing- impaired can become fluent in reading and writing, but those who are not deaf can also benefit from learning ASL through building a better vocabulary, boosting mental stimulation, and it offers …show more content…
When speaking, people have a natural tendency to also use their body while communicating. Such as hand gestures, facial movements, shoulder shrugs, etc. As reported by Speech Buddy, “ASL takes those natural tendencies and helps reinforce vocabulary and the meaning of words.” (O) When you hear a word, and see a word, it leaves a stronger, longer lasting memory of it on the brain. In ASL signs are commonly close tied to the actual meaning of the word. Therefore, leaving a longer lasting memory of the word. For example, sccoe.org states the Sign “You” in ASL is a finger pointing at to whom you are communicating to.” (Wahl) This simple gesture is very commonly used by those who are not fluent in …show more content…
Jobs available to people fluent in ASL are rich and rewarding. Because of this ASL has a growing popularity. As reported by the Modern Association Statics, “ASL is the 4th most studied modern foreign language, at Colleges and Universities.” (Goldberg, Looney, Lusin) Many students are choosing to learn ASL because it offers them a higher chance of getting a job and, because the need for a ASL interpreters are always at a high desire. ASL interpreting is very popular and is used in many job environments, such as education, health, and social services. Public school districts, college and universities across the country are scrambling to fill empty ASL interpreter positons. According to Verywell.org, “In education, there is always a need for people who know sign language”. Some positions that included using ASL in schools would be a special education teacher, college professors of deaf colleges and programs within the schools. Medical professionals and interpreters who know sign language are also in popular demand. Many hospitals are desperate for their help and willing to pay good money to those who can provide said services. Verywell.org states, “There are so many people who are denied proper care from hospitals because of their inability to communicate properly with staff.” In addition, a social service job is another great and rewarding job for those who are fluent in ASL.

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