Essay On Early Literacy

Improved Essays
Learning to read and write is critical to a child’s success in school and later in life. It is critical for educators to know that children do not become literate automatically. The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) provides guidelines for Developmentally Appropriate Practices that support teachers in fostering young children motivation to learn and discover. Acquiring the knowledge on how to read and write takes time, and maturity. Furthermore, in order to help the children become successful in it, educators have to integrate the four components of literacy development in their everyday practices (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), which requires careful planning and clear instruction. In support of NAEYC approach, stood Lesley Mandel Morrow in her article on DAP in Early Literacy Instruction (2004), where again she stands …show more content…
The students will be encouraged to draw their own self-portraits by looking at the table - mirrors and one long - mirror. The mirrors allow the children to look, explore, identify, and analyze their image. In addition to gaining self-awareness, the children will display a progression in self-identification, and fine motor skills. Features that may not have been depicted in the beginning of the year show up later on as they grow and develop. Children will sign their portraits. At the end of the day, each child will have a turn sharing his/her drawing during meeting time. As a group we will engage in indentifying details, and look for similarities and differences among us. During this activity the teacher will focus on the informal assessment in the classroom, and its importance in improving practice. Based on Reading Standards for Literature for Kindergarten this activity will help the children to make connections between self, text and the world around

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Piaget also believed that children construct knowledge within themselves from these interactions with the environment (Esnar, 2014). Piaget divided cognitive development into four stages: sensorimotor, preoperational, concrete-operational, and formal-operational (Roe & Smith, 2012, p.119). It is important for teachers to understand which stage their students are in and to adapt their reading instruction to fit the characteristics of the students at that stage. For example, a student in the preoperational stage, realized that symbols stand for spoken language, and will use them in writing to show their comprehension of a piece of…

    • 1101 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Students in elementary school begin to advance in reading by first learning to read and later improve reading to learn. It’s critical that all students become strategic learners in the world. Students who recognize which strategies to use and when to use them to comprehend text are strategic learners. A few students use the strategies naturally while most students struggle to read the text with understanding. There is a desperate need for teachers to teach comprehension strategies to guide their students with learning to read and understand.…

    • 769 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Brainstorming: I will let my student do that when I start a new topic, I will let them know the topic and let them brainstorm it. As it can help them to foster their creativity and it also can help them to prepare their new art project. It will be a good start form them before their new project. 5. Bookmarks: I will give them reading to bring back home to read, and they can use the bookmarking skill to jot down and highlight what they don 't understand for the reading and we will go through them together in class.…

    • 781 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Introduction Before a child enters school, the child has some knowledge of language and how words work. Children are innately curious and teachers in early childhood programs need to foster children’s early literary through research based, developmentally appropriate literacy activities that fosters the essential skills that students need in order to build the foundation for learning to read. A huge component of this type of instruction is phonological awareness, which is an umbrella terms that encompasses word in sentences, syllables, onset-rime, alliteration, and phonemic awareness. Phonemic awareness is isolating the phoneme (smallest unit of sound) in words. These skills are crucial to a child’s early reading success (Roskos, 2003).…

    • 1207 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Literacy Interview Essay

    • 953 Words
    • 4 Pages

    I have to be aware of different needs and how they will make progress throughout the year. If I don’t expose children to practice literacy skills, they will have a hard time to adjust and make progress throughout the year. The classroom should be set up in a way that there is room for play, circle time, and individual work. I believe it would be best if I would create a newsletter or have a meeting for parents to inform them of ways they can help their children grow through literacy practice and how important it is to have them involved at a young age. As society is advancing and so is technology allowing for them to explore is a good idea for them to adapt to society.…

    • 953 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    According to Taylor (2008) Jean Piaget’s preoperational stage of development ranges from the age of two to seven. One part of the stage, period of intuitive allows for the child to consider other viewpoints (Taylor, 2008, p. 269). As a teacher leader, I guide other educators to present awesome lessons on Jean Piaget’s preoperational stage of development for Pre K through second grade students. For example, during a second grade reading lesson about inferences, I asked a second grade teacher to share ways to encourage the students to interact with each other by learning the skill. In order to support Piaget’s preoperational stage and how important it is for educators to present lessons to students according to their stage of development,…

    • 961 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Having the ability to comprehend an expository text is vital to inquiry based learning and is one that must be taught to students first before this style of learning is successfully implement. The lack of exposure to expository texts early on in a child’s academic career may place readers at a disadvantage because students increasingly are expected to learn from expository texts in language arts, science, and social studies (Meyer & Ray,…

    • 1632 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    It is vital to pay closer attention to the stages that the children will exhibit to have a better idea of the milestones they already reached and the ones may be delayed to provide them support and help the to develop their higher potential. Infants and toddlers need periods to develop language, trust, and a positive sense of themselves. Between the activities that educators for infant and toddlers can establish are the implement of safety activities that support their gross and fine motor development like practice walking u and down stairs. In the cognitive area, it is fundamental to promote reading time, especially for the kids whose first language is not English. In the social-emotional aspect it is need to work with positive behavior reinforcement, and avoiding to point out their negative behaviors.…

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    1. How can content area teachers plan and design instruction so that students will actively engage in literacy- and subject-related activities? According to Carney and Indrisano (2013), disciplinary literacy is when reading, writing, speaking, and listening are inserted in all classes, including math, science, and social studies. Teachers need to present strategies that will aid students with being successful in their classroom. However, it vital for educators to know and understand what strategies will impact students’ learning the most.…

    • 1799 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Before insertion of students in guided reading groups it is vital to assess your students reading levels in order for accurate and proper placement. ¬In order to do guided reading effectively your students need to be placed in guided reading groups with similar needs. Assessment does not end at placement, but rather, assessment needs to be ongoing and the groups need to be flexible. The “Running Record” developed by Dr. Marie Clay provides the best information to determine placement in a guided reading group. Running records also provide the information necessary to offer support and instruction to each child in the group.…

    • 1158 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays