Learning Disabilities

1834 Words 8 Pages
Learning Disabilities
According to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004), a learning disability can be defined as “a disorder in one of more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding on in using language, spoken or written, which disorder may manifest itself in the imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell, or do mathematical calculations.” The disorders included under learning disabled are perceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia. It does not include learning problems due to visual, hearing, or motor disabilities, mental retardation, emotional disturbance, or environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage (Pullen, 2016).
…show more content…
Comprehension is spread into all curriculums, thus becoming a critically important skill for our students to master. According to McLaughlin (2012), comprehension can be broken down into ten teaching principals that focus on the role of students and teachers, in addition to, how educators should engage students into a more reflective level of comprehension.
The first teaching principal reflected in the article focuses on the schema-based learning development, in which students connect new information to prior knowledge thus enhancing their comprehension of the material. When students are exposed to information that they can use as prior knowledge, or are engaged in an activity that allows them to activate their prior knowledge, it offers the ability to create connection and deepen their comprehension. The second teaching principal emphasizes the role of the student in reading being either strengthened or weakened by their skill set of comprehensive decoding
…show more content…
The teacher must focus on introducing strategies to use before reading, during reading, and after reading. These strategies should be determined by the students’ needs and should be observed in order to be proven effective for the individual child (Lyons and Thompson, 2012). Guided reading provides teachers with the time to differentiate instruction based on levels of comprehension and fluency. By using this strategy with student with learning disabilities, educators will train the brain of these individuals to use strategies to comprehend text in a more effective

Related Documents