Learning A Native Language

Great Essays
Around the world people grow up learning a native language, some people grow up learning two. Many people move to a new area where customs, beliefs and language differ from what they’re used to. This can be a harrowing struggle, especially for children still in school. Trying to learn for your education while not knowing the language can be difficult but teachers can help. By analyzing their students and their progress teachers can help these students accomplish what they need to. In Mr. O’Malley’s sixth grade class there is Maria. Maria has started just begun the school year and speaks no English. Aside from knowing her name and age there is not much information on her native language or her background with English. Throughout the first few …show more content…
Mr. O’Malley’s primary concern is with this written words. To help Mikhail with his writing he will be given a vocabulary assignment. He will be given a list of level appropriate words and their definition. His assignment is use those words in a paragraph, using the definition as reference for the context in which he should be using it. This assignment will help him properly use words in his writing and get a better grasp on what these English words mean. The comprehensible input theory is being used for this assignment as well. He is being encouraged to look into the meanings of the words and apply them to his writing. This will give him a better comprehension of these …show more content…
O’Malley should look into getting tutored on how to work best with children who have limited English. By learning new techniques and acquiring strategies on how to best assist these children he will have a greater chance of getting them to where they need to be academically. Looking into the different levels of English competency there are for English learners and the different program options that can be referenced will help give him an idea of how to set something similar up in his classroom. Mr. O’Malley should look into the different programs such as bilingual immersion and structured immersion and figure out what best suits the needs of his students. (Linquanti, 2009,

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Rodriguez has an alternative approach to the controversial topic of bilingualism. His opinion reflects a more practical, logical approach to bilingualism. When explaining his past experiences of English teachers in American classrooms, Rodriguez states “What they understood was that I needed to speak a public language” (20). He expresses gratitude towards his previous instructors because he believes that “Fortunately, my teachers were unsentimental about their responsibility” (20). Their responsibility being to teach Rodriguez the public language of…

    • 755 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Even though one common language is important in the connection of this country, the other languages must not go without value. Even though there seems to be a popular “American” culture, the other cultures and values must not go without consideration. All deserve fair representation and opportunities within the public schools as well as in everyday life. As Herschel T. Manual states, “We must courageously attack the difficult problems of building a united community and adjusting education to the needs of children who come to us with differences which challenge our best efforts” (Manuel 639). Through bilingual education, students can feel value in their native language and culture while simultaneously learning English. They must not be unjustly cast aside into “sink or swim” classrooms, hoping that something will catch on. Each student deserves the respect of their language, abilities, and culture. Although it took and will take many years of court cases, riots, and laws to advance bilingual and education in general to a fair level, it is the responsibility of the government and community to assure that education continues to respect and offer opportunities to all…

    • 1720 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This failure occurs because some programs in the U.S. aim to provide ELLs sufficient English language skills that allows them to communicate with classmates and teachers and to work with the curriculum (Baker, 2011). However, the ELLs’ cognitive academic language proficiency has not been developed adequately to manage the demands of the curriculum (Baker, 2011). Baker (2011) writes that what Cummins considers essential in the bilingual education of ELLs is that the ‘Common Underlying Proficiency’ be well developed either in the first or second language, or in both languages…

    • 1364 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The second largest influx of immigrants has happened in past two decades. More immigrants are coming to America, in search of a better life for their children (Stepanek, 2010). With this influx of immigrants, comes an influx in the amount of students who are English Language Learners (ELL). According to Stepanek, between the years 2002-2003 and 2007-2008, the Northwest’s yearly growth in English Language Learners was five times faster than the national average (2010). This influx of ELL students is a call for more drastic measures to be taken to make sure that these students are getting the education they need and deserve, yet nothing seems to be getting done. There are family programs that are being implemented, but they don 't offer any benefits…

    • 1221 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As Maria worked at Francis Lewis high school, she noticed several changes in the students throughout the years. They seemed to gradually lose respect for authority, lose respect for each other, lose etiquette, and lose aspiration for the future, living for the moment instead. Despite that, she was still able to develop special bonds with students at the Francis Lewis high school. Maria was able to become one of the people that created a comfortable and safe environment within Francis Lewis high school through her great sense of…

    • 483 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    However, he is able to perform at a high level when having to display his knowledge using other means to relay his understanding. This is a result of the language barrier. Although, the student is able to comprehend the information in his native language, he continues to struggle when using only English to answer the information within the text. Whereas, student five excels in spelling he struggles with reading comprehension. When he works through the process with a peer he is able to succeed but does need guidance throughout the…

    • 740 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    During the 1960’s several factors allowed very little opportunities to bring back bilingual education (Baker,2001). The Bilingual Education Act of 1968, has been one of the most important act throughout the history of Bilingual Education. (Mazanares, 1988), stated that the act is seen as one of the first official federal recognition of the needs and rights of students with limited English speaking abilities. The act has gone through four reauthorizations, 1974,1978,1984 and 1988, with amendments based on a change for students and society.…

    • 672 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Esl/Ell Research Paper

    • 223 Words
    • 1 Pages

    Often immigrant students are placed in a classroom where only English is spoken and where therefore they can understand nothing of what they heard. This is a situation where the student is completely abandoned to their fate, and the reason for why many fail occurs. The school system expects ESL/ELL/ ELP decode, assimilate and succeed academically immediately with their English.…

    • 223 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Mr. O Malley Case

    • 345 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The two ELL students that Mr. O’Malley is currently teaching in his sixth grade English class are both Maria and Mikhail. Maria to begin with has been in the English class for about five months since she joined Mr. O’Malley’s English class. Then, she did not know how to communicate with English in any way, and unfortunately, Mr. O’Malley did not speak her native language too. It was thus extremely difficult for her to communicate with anyone. All that the two used in the form of communication is non-verbal forms of communications like nodding when agreeing to something. Currently…

    • 345 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    I believe that students are in an advantageous position to adjust fairly quickly to the environment and the class setting, especially when they had done one or two years of grammar school education from their original country. However, teachers need to have a basic understanding of the characteristics and differences between first-language (L1) and second-language (L2) learning. ELL’s need more scaffolding; particularly in performing academic tasks such verbal and non-verbal learning, this with the determination to proclaim better results in classroom participation and in the overall learning of all content areas.…

    • 441 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Great Essays

    Title III brings attention to the needs of English-language learners, referred to in the NCLB as Limited English Proficient (hereafter referred to as LEP) students (No Child Left Behind Act). NCLB requires schools to report all scores from standardized tests and meet AYP with all subgroups (2001). The Act also requires LEP students to take English proficiency exams yearly. There is no national agreement on the definition of “English-proficient”. There is a lack of effective testing accommodations for LEP students, (Abedi), a lack of resources for their teachers (Neill), and a lack of recognition of the fact that LEP students have a different starting point than non-LEP students with regards to AYP, all making it more difficult for these students to succeed. In addition, Title III focuses exclusively on English, a transition from a previous focus on bilingual education. The purpose of this essay is to analyze this transition via the following question:…

    • 1516 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Nowadays, lots of Hispanic immigrants live in the United States and are looking for a better life and a better future. Among those immigrants are also lot of children that come daily to schools knowing little English, or no English at all. According to the Census Bureau of United States, in 2030 students who speak a language other than English at home, will constitute the 40 percent of the school-age population nationwide. Among those students, the Spanish-speaking students will represent the majority. Eighty percent of English language learners speak Spanish as a second language at home or have Hispanic heritage. According to the Education Council of Large Cities in Washington, this percentage means that about one in every five students in school districts will need a bilingual teacher.…

    • 529 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Which was a project proposed late 1960s in hopes of helping children adapt and learn faster in the american schooling system by allowing them to use there “family language as the language of school”, then he disagrees with the system by claiming that “it is not possible for a child… to use his family's language in school”, because this only restrains or furthers pushes the child away from actually adapting and assimilating the american schooling system any quicker at all (Rodriguez,…

    • 1131 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This paper will explore the article “Preschool programs face challenge of preparing staff to teach English learners” by Sarah Tully. This article was published on December 10, 2015 on the website EdSource. Thus as the title of the article indicates, this paper will be talking about the challenges of preparing staff on how to teach children that are English language learners. As well this article looks at the effects that the educator has on the children when they don’t share the same language. Thus in this article Tully is trying to shown the benefits that’s bilingual educators can have children as discusses the need for correct strategies to teach English language learners.…

    • 971 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Language learning and teaching course is a necessary course for everyone interested in the field of teaching English as a second language. This course provided me with theories and explanations in how human acquired the first and second language and what factors can affect their ability to acquire the language. There are three theories that have been described first language acquisition. Behaviorist approach insists that language behavior is a production of correct response to a particular stimulus. Functional approach focused on the social interaction while the nativist theory insists that we are born with the inner ability to understand and developed language. All of these theories explained just one aspect and factor…

    • 1259 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays