The Importance Of Lack Of Knowledge

1008 Words 4 Pages
Lack of knowledge, for example,in a quantitative research conducted by (Timilshina et al 2011), was reported to be associated with sub-optimal use of personal protective equipment with only 22% of staff having the correct knowledge about standard precautions. A positive correlation has also been reported between knowledge and hand hygiene practices in nursing and medical students, with less knowledge leading to lower levels of compliance Suchitra and Lakshmi Devi (2013). However, there has been some confusion regarding whether improvements in knowledge raises levels of compliance with infection prevention and control precautions. DeJoy et al (2000), for example, reported that better knowledge predicted a 65% better general compliance with …show more content…
On the contrary Lankford et al (2003) reported that an increase in the number of hand hygiene basins did not however improve hand washing compliance. It therefore seems that, even when it is possible to identify factors which adversely affect compliance, addressing these factors does not entail positive changes in actual practice. One of the reasons that may contribute to this, is lack of ability to transfare knowledge gained from research into practice and has been found to be the most common and consistent finding from clinical research, (Grimshaw, 2012). With a common finding being the difference between available evidence and clinical decision making (Curran et al 2011). While (Grimshaw et al, 2012) suggest that the basic unit of knowledge transfare and translation must be either systematic and continuous reviews or other types of syntheses of research findings, these have been found to be very rare in infection prevention and …show more content…
This must therefore be considered when planning ways to improve compliance practices. However, even when faced with implementation barriers, evidence suggest that some organisational interventions can improve practice in infection prevention and control. One of the interventions that has shown to improve hand hygiene compliance was the introduction of alcohol hand rub with a 100% compliance rate (Scheithauer et al 2012). However, (Whtbey et al 2008) suggested that the introduction of alcohol hand rub will work better if compliance is combined with behaviour modification techniques, a clear indication that a more multi-modal approach will be needed, though unsure whether the use of alcohol hand rubs reduced the rates of

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