The Importance Of Knowledge

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Albert Einstein once said, “in the middle of difficulty lies opportunity” (Gurteen). It is only with great adversity that valuable knowledge be produced. Difficulty in production equates itself with standards that knowledge production must meet, whether it be a review board, public appraisal, or internal conflict. I will analyze the conception that worthwhile knowledge must be rooted in arduous backgrounds or a series of struggles and tests that knowledge must undergo. Knowledge like steel must be tempered with a flame of diverging ideals, if it should shatter under that heat then it must be inadequate. I will analyze the notion that knowledge must be produced against great odds focalizing through faith, reason, and emotion as my primary ways …show more content…
“When Charles Darwin married Emma Wedgewood, she told him she wanted to love and be with him forever. And "forever," for Emma, meant beyond "till death do us part." In her day, people of her background and class believed in an afterlife, an eternity either in heaven (for those who had faith) or the "other place" (for those who did not). Emma knew her husband had doubts and worried that his scientific investigations would only deepen his doubts, therefore condemning her to an eternity alone” (Krulwich 2009). “Gopnik says Darwin feared ‘it would hurt her, it would undermine her, it would pain her for him to publish these ideas’” (Krulwich 2009). Thus the production of one of the most evolutionary theories in science was delayed by 21 years in part of the emotion and love Darwin had for his wife Emma. Reifying my argument that in order for an idea to be taken seriously, that notion must undergo serious contemplation whether that be internalized, or externally assessed. The only exception that comes to mind is the miasma theory that was derived from Hippocrates’ theory of the four humors. That theory lasted until Dr. John Snow disproved using the 1854 Broad Street Cholera outbreak as a case study, and then the miasma theory fell way to the beginning of modern germ theory (Johnson …show more content…
With the 1844 postage date in that letter to his cousin Emma chronologically came after Darwin returned from his voyage on the H.M.S Beagle, and consequently, after Darwin began to theorize about evolution. Thus, Darwin underwent both the consideration and weighed the opportunity costs of publishing Origin of Species. Darwin assessed those costs as both how the public would react and how his discovery would change science, as the pillar we look at biology and evolution today through. To the personal conflictions and struggles of faith, that Darwin underwent through the entirety of his life as an evolutionist. In addition to what he feared would be the dissolution of his marriage. In contrast to that of the miasma theory. Which historically was very easily accepted and eventually phased out. We do not respect nor hold the miasma theory to the same degree of reverence that we hold the theory of natural selection and the concept of evolution. Thus, even if a theory comes into being with relative ease, eventually it will be disproven and it will not be revered to the same degree that something born out of adverse times would be. That internal conflict in conjunction with

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