The Importance Of Justice In Plato's Statesman

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The Statesman, is political as it is concerned with human herds. However, from the vantage point of the herds, the internal relations dispose the soul of an individual human being and recede dramatically. Therefore, with the distance diminishes the interest in justice. This proves that justice is not a large concern of the statesman. The Statesman sets forth a doctrine of governing. This doctrine requires an expertise of participation. In Plato’s Statesman the whole virtue of a political community is an issue and risk throughout. In the Statesman, he uses a particular method to show the various effects of the king, and genuine statesman “naked and alone by himself” (304a). However, the stranger isn’t all about logic. In the text, the stranger …show more content…
Through the text, we learn politics is art that brings other types of arts in the city together. Moreover, “everything that’s artful has participated in measurement” (285a). As we discover, the true statesman knows how to interweave different types of souls together. In order to get to the end, it requires something that the Stanger is shocked by. The text suggests virtue is to be defined by, “a war between courage and moderation”. The two types of virtues, according to the Stranger “have a deep-seated enmity toward one another and maintain an oppositional faction in many of the things that are” (306b). The two kinds of virtue seem to define the concept of that we call …show more content…
This will generate the needful thing, which is in a political way is the synthesis of virtuous opposites. Statesmanship means that one is an elitist or one of the best. Therefore, there must be a known way to help determine who is fit and not fit for an ethical and political education. This can consist of observing young children playing in order to observe which one’s show signs of a disposition that looks virtuous. The stranger puts a fair amount of emphasis on those individuals who prove to be that they are uneducable. The stranger describes these people as “violently driven off course by a bad nature into godlessness and arrogance and injustice ” (308e-309a). The political problem casts them out by frankly punishing them, which to me is harsh. At this point, the stranger in the text intertwines the union of moderate and manly natures, with the intertwining of the woof and warp (309b), which has the effect of closing the paradigm web that was started earlier in the text. In order for the city to be suited to protect all those it embraces, it needs two kinds of human threads. These threads consist of hard and soft. The unity of opposites seen in the text requires a system with two-tiers of civic education. The system produces two types of “bonds” with one high and one low. The bond that is higher is known as divine. This is true because it is applied to the “eternal born” part of the

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