Neutrality In The Progressive Era

Superior Essays
President Woodrow Wilson once said, “It is a fearful thing to lead this great peaceful people into war… but the right is more precious than peace and we shall fight for the things which we have always carried on our hearts” (Jackson). Germany 's lack of respect for Americas right of neutrality, the evidence for the Zimmermann telegraph, and Americas connection with the Allies led the U.S. to join the war the American people tried so hard to avoid (Sloan 2). Americas goal was to save the world through their economic goods, their democratic policies, and their mix of morality and Christianity, making the world a better place (The War). From the Progressive era to joining the war and right on into the Jazz age, America gained strength, but lacked …show more content…
Entering into the Jazz age the United State found a new confidence and became known as the leaders of the free world. As a nation, America chose neutrality, but ended up being dragged into a war the Americans thought of as a horror.
Before the war started in 1914, ultimately over Franz Ferdinand’s assassination on June 28th, 1914, America was growing in what was known as the Progressive Era. This era lasted through the end of the war in the 1920s. It was an era of progression, as the first American urban reform movement, it concerned industrialization and brought about a spirit of optimism among the American people. There was the belief that if the environment can be changed, so could the person. Women during this era fought for the right to take part in politics, something they were not allowed to be a part of. Capitalism was challenged and racial issues were addressed. Muckrakers educated the public by exposing the corruptions in the food industry, and gained popular support for the reform. An honest and efficient government was the focus of the reformers and brought about a strong Democracy with a commission system, city-management

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