The Effect Of The Japanese Attack On Pearl Harbor

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During World War II President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued presidential order along with congress support to give military authority to exclude americans with japanese descent from areas deemed essential to national security. This executive order forced hundreds of thousands of American citizens with Japanese descent into internment camps in the central regions of the United States. The executive order served as a security mechanism after the japanese attacks on pearl harbor. A Lot of Japanese Americans believed this order infringed upon their constitutional rights. This was the grounds Fred Korematsu was petitioning the United States government on. While the United States government argued that these internment camps were essential in …show more content…
During the World War 2 era there was much controversy in the United States on whether or not the U.S. should enter combat. On the morning of December 7th the occurrence of pearl harbor, a japanese attack on a harbor in Hawaii changed the controversy to virtually unanimous support for entrance into the war. These events were all possible due to a man named Takeo Yoshikawa, a japanese spy sent to Pearl Harbor in order to gain intelligence on the base. This is was the basis for President Roosevelt’s law mandating that those U.S. citizens with japanese ancestry would be placed in internment camps. Throughout the duration of the war the United State collected many coded messages from the japanese stating “We have already established contacts with absolutely reliable Japanese in the San Pedro and San Diego area, who will keep a close watch on all shipments of airplanes and other war materials…” and things of the sort. These messages essentially show that there were in fact japanese spies within the United States boundaries. This message and messages like this a the reason President Roosevelt placed japanese americans in camps. By his standard he did so in order to insure the protection of the people of the United States, the people whom he was responsible for. As the president of the United States it was Franklin Roosevelt’s duty to protect over 300 million people, he was only doing …show more content…
When society looks at rapists, we almost always look towards the male population and never question it. It seems as though the only racial or sexist controversies we can ever produce is directed “in favor” of racial minorities or women. In contrast, we completely lose the fact of american concentration camps in Japan when we discuss this. This shows kind of the equality of the treatment of minority individuals during war time in both

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