Japanese Internment Camps Before Pearl Harbor Essay

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The Japanese arrived in the United States to be able to get more options to be successful, although when they made it to the U.S. No one knew how to speak Japanese, no one knew much about their culture. They were not accepted right away because people were very eerie of them. It was more of rude eyes staring at the Japanese, they’d have to go through a lot of discrimination while the other people in the United States are doing their own thing to not accept them. In these days of this generation, the foreigners and Japanese are now tied together and do not discriminate as much as they did back then in the year before Pearl Harbor attacked. When they came I am sure they thought they were on another planet they did not have the same style of living …show more content…
The Japanese Americans were held in camps that often were isolated, uncomfortable, and overcrowded. Although their families were treated unjustly in this way, more than 33,000 Japanese Americans served in the military with distinction. (April 10, 2015) Pearl Harbor Attack On December 7, 1941 there was a surprise attack in Pearl Harbor on Oahu Island, in Hawaii by the Japanese. The unexpected strike had worsened the relations of Japan and the United States. Japan invaded China in 1937with the alliance of Axis powers in 1940, by the end of 1941 the United States had tied its relations with Japan. (The Editors of Encyclopedia Britannica, December 15, 2017) Executive Order 9066 President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the Executive Order, by June more than 110,000 Japanese Americans were relocated to a camp built by the U.S. military. Japanese Americans had to go through very extreme living conditions and poor treatment by their military guards. In World War 2, Americans were accused to be spying on Japan. The President Ronald Reagan signed a bill of $20,000 as an apology from the U.S government. …show more content…
That’s what the Japanese did, they immigrated to the U.S in the 1880’s. Being able to accept them only came when they were forced to go through one of the worst crimes in the 20’s against civil liberty. In the Second World War, they forced more than 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry it was a tough time for them being cramped with all the other living bodies in such a small place. Although their families were treated unjustly in this way, more than 33,000 Japanese Americans served in the military with distinction. On December 7, 1941 there was an unexpected surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, this made the tie of Japan and the Unites States much worse than it already was. . Japan invaded China in 1937with the alliance of Axis powers in 1940, by the end of 1941 the United States had tied its relations with Japan. A little after 2 months after the attack about 120,000 Japanese Americans had to relocate to a different internment camp. In early 1942, the Roosevelt administration was pressured to remove persons of Japanese ancestry from the west coast by farmers seeking to eliminate Japanese competition, a public fearing sabotage, politicians hoping to gain by standing against an unpopular group, and military authorities. The Hawaii Provisional Infantry Battalion was formed near

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