The Importance Of Interviews In Research

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Interviews will be the primary means to collect the data for this study. Each participant will be interviewed based on an interview guide (see Appendix B: Interview Guide). Because of the complexity of meeting the participant more than once semi-structured interviews will be the most convenient to collect the data (Doody & Noonan, 2013). Semi-structured interviews will help the researcher to develop a keen understanding of the experience of the undocumented immigrants. The interviews will allow participants to share their stories, as suggested by many researchers namely Newton (2010); Seidman (2013); Jacob et al. (2012); Knox & Burkard (2009). The interviews will be mostly of open-ended questions, and emphasis will be placed on the responsive …show more content…
It encompasses the entire experimental concept and establishes whether the results obtained meet all of the requirements of the scientific research method. Seliger and Shohamy (1989) noted that validity is one of the core concerns in qualitative research. They also argued that research can be affected by factors which are irrelevant to the concerns of the research, but still affect and nullify the findings. Controlling all possible factors that may threaten this research’s validity is the researcher’s primary responsibility (Silverman (Ed.), 2010; Maxwell, 2005). A researcher must be aware that internal validity can be affected by flaws originating in the design of the study or issues related to the data collection instrument(s). In this study, the data will be collected according to the University standards, and analysis will be performed in accordance with the rules set by the institution to assure the validity of this research study. As many researchers such as Trochim (2010); Denzin & Lincoln (2009); Wilke et al (2009) and Flick (2009) warned that if findings of a study are affected by reasons other than those thought to have caused them, or because the interpretation of the data by the researcher is not academically supported; then the findings are internally invalid and cannot be reported (Silverman (Ed.), 2010; Maxion, 2011; Willig, …show more content…
Understanding of any phenomenon requires, at least, knowing the facts or specifics about that phenomenon (Fleck, 2012). Outside a particular context that shapes those facts yet they lack of meanings. Descriptions always depend on the perceptions, inclinations, and emotions from the describer (e.g., White, 2014; Roether et al., 2009; Smith, 2010; Gill & Andreychik, 2009). Researchers seeking to describe an experience select what they will describe and, in the process of featuring certain aspects of it, begin to transform that experience (Dokic & Lemaire, 2013). Although no description is interpretation proof, basic or fundamental qualitative description, as opposed to, phenomenological or grounded theory description, requires a kind of interpretation that is low-inference, or likely to result in easier consensus among researchers (Kvale & Brinkmann, 2009; Remler & Van Ryzin, 2010). For example, one researcher may describe a fact or the feelings and a second researcher describes the events during an interview, both researchers will likely find a common denominator while reporting the interviews (Flick, 2009). Reporting qualitative study results can be difficult for qualitative researchers (Boeije, 2009; Denzin & Lincoln, 2011). Many researchers argued that focusing on techniques and issues of collecting, processing, and analyzing data for qualitative

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