Intertextuality Analysis

1223 Words 5 Pages
Life in the 21st century has brought about incredible advances in technology, reasoning and creativity. With the development of the World Wide Web, we have seen ideas spread faster than ever and questions answered that no one ever thought existed. The reason for such advancements is credited to the progression of social networking on the medial platform, as well as the access to limitless resources that allow us to familiarize ourselves with topics that even the most extensive libraries in the world fail to include. The limitations of our world today haven’t even been brushed and we see no end in sight. Although modern technology has allowed us to advance in the ways that we write, there are certain ramifications to the access of information …show more content…
Does intertextuality damage the originality and validity of our claims, or does the idea of borrowing bits and pieces of information contribute meaning and credibility to our arguments as a whole? In this paper I will examine the fact that intertextuality has allowed the world to advance in the way that we write. Intertextuality does not in fact inhibit originality, but rather it is the sole reason people are able to generate new and influential point of views—by building upon writing of the …show more content…
Individuals in the modern world have become much more concerned about what belongs to them. One of the issues that has come to the world’s attention even more recently is the topic of plagiarism or borrowing writer’s ideas without permission. With the use of intertextuality and idea sharing, many of the writings that we see today are constructed of similar meanings and even exact references to other writing works. The problem that we see is that few people can differentiate between what is plagiarism and what is an original argument. Johndan Johnson-Eilola adds to this conversation by commenting that high school and college students often find difficulty in differentiating between their own ideas, and the ideas of someone that has made similar connections before. Johnson-Eilola asserts this by stating that “Because students still recognize the primary value placed on original text, they sometimes hide their borrowings and appropriations”. This is a compelling connection because with the modern emphasis on referencing borrowed work and giving credit to the owners, we often lose track of who is originally making the claim in the first place. Is the claim theirs, ours, or someone that we don’t even know exists? In the four years that I attended highschool, I never wrote a research oriented paper that didn’t require a formatted works cited page after the conclusion. Although this requirement was essential

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