The Importance Of Interracial Relationships

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Register to read the introduction… The purpose of this study is to see which factors, in particular, influence how a person feels towards interracial relationships and whether or not certain factors influence a person’s decision to enter an interracial relationship. Specifically, I felt that there were certain factors that would be important in a person’s willingness to engage in an interracial relationship. These factors consisted of parent/family input, age, race, gender, religion, political affiliation, personal background and education level, with some of these factors weighing more heavily than others. I will also examine the attitudes towards interracial dating, especially with respect to how each individual perceived society’s view on interracial relationships, and whether or not the views of society impacted each person’s individual dating behavior. At the conclusion of the study, I hope to contribute to the existing literature regarding interracial dating and marriage. In addition the literature I will discuss more ways how people choose or do not choose to date/marry interracially rather than just the patterns that are seen in marriage licenses, as in the previous research. Overall, I hope that the findings from this research project will provide more diverse …show more content…
A limitation of in-depth interviews is that it relies on people’s memories of their lives, which is certainly clouded by age. Interview responses are also prone to being biased. This bias occurs when members of certain groups (the more politically liberal, or more educated, for example) respond to questions about their attitudes in the way that they think they are “supposed” to respond in order for their responses to be socially acceptable. Every effort should be made to design a data collection effort, create instruments, and conduct interviews to allow for minimal bias. Interviewer must be appropriately trained in interviewing techniques. To provide the most detailed and rich data from an interviewee, the interviewer must make that person comfortable and appear interested in what they are saying. They must also be sure to use effective interview techniques, such as avoiding yes/no and leading questions, using appropriate body language, and keeping their personal opinions in check. When in-depth interviews are conducted, generalizations about the results are usually not able to be made because small samples are chosen and random sampling methods are not used. In-depth interviews however, provide valuable information for programs, …show more content…
and Barry Emerson. 2005. “New Marriages, New Families: U.S. Racial and Hispanic Intermarriage.” Population Bulletin 60.2. South, Scott J. 1991. Sociodemographic Differentials in Mate Selection Preferences. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 53, 4, 928-940. Teitler, Nancy E. Reichman, Susan Sprachman. 2003. “Costs and Benefits of Improving Response Rates for a Hard-to-Reach Population.” The Public Opinion Quarterly, 67: 126-138. Vaquera, Elizabeth and Grace Kao. 2005. “Private and Public Displays of Affection Among Interracial and Intra-Racial Adolescent Couples.” Social Science Quarterly 86.2:484-508. Yancey, George A. 2001. “An Analysis of Resistance to Racial Exogamy: The 1998 South Carolina Referendum.” Journal of Black Studies

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