The Importance Of Intelligence Testing

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Intelligence tests measure the potential cognitive capabilities of an individual (Gregory, 2011). Achievement tests help measure an individual’s achievements such as how he or she mastered skills and acquired knowledge resulting from schooling and/or training that individual has received (Gregory, 2011). Intelligence tests and achievement tests should correlate with one another; however, this is not always the case (Gregory, 2011). Several intelligence tests exist; however, educational personnel and clinicians only utilized a select few (Gregory, 2011). An example of an intelligence test is the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale (SB5) (Gregory, 2011). The SB5 is suitable for individuals of ages two through eighty-five and up (Gregory, …show more content…
Both assessments contain different subtests. The SB5 takes between 45 to 90 minutes or longer depending on the age and subtests that are given whereas the KTEA-II ranges from 30 to 80 minutes depending on age (Gregory, 2011; Marom, 2003). Both tests take into consideration the appropriate items for the specific age of the individual (Gregory, 2011). Investigating the results of these tests can help detect intellectual disabilities; however, one should pay attention to results in order to analyze whether or not an individual has an intellectual disability (Gregory, 2011). Intellectual disabilities can be challenging to assess without looking at learning ability, the functioning of the central nervous system, psychosocial skills, physical and sensory abilities, and ruling out non-intellectual difficulties (Gregory, …show more content…
The diverse scores between intelligence and achievement may yield an intellectual disability for the participant even if that participant has high or normal intelligence score and low when it comes to his or her achievement score (Gregory, 2011). Furthermore, an examiner must weigh out the advantages and disadvantages of the assessments they are assigning to an examinee in comparison to the needs of that individual (Gregory, 2011). By incorporating the best assessments for the examinee possible, the examiner will be able to analyze and assist each individual even when the intelligence and achievement scores are not consistent with one

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