The Importance Of Integration

2165 Words 9 Pages
Throughout most of life I have been witness to real life de facto segregation. And I have learned that segregation is natural and normal but that integration is also natural and normal when it is done by choice. My small hometown is a vast majority of white middle class citizens. I am very aware that I have a lot to learn when it comes to cultural differences and due to my unfamiliarity I find the easiest way to ease myself into the situation is to simply observe. When I sought out more knowledge about the true, raw, deep, real culture of my surroundings I tried to open my eyes and ears and put my iPhone down in the most obvious of all places. I aimed to be open and approachable with my body language and tried to release all my preconceived …show more content…
I honestly believe they would be much happier at a more majority black school. However, I do not think that racism is something we can fix as a society. It is simply human nature to reflect on similarities and differences when meeting or addressing a person. By shaming racism we are forcing people to cover up their true feelings and that makes nobody happy. I would never want a black person to be nice to me because I am white and they feel that if they were not nice it would be racism. On the other hand I would never hope to make a black person feel like they could not talk to me. If they are comfortable and I am comfortable I think an interracial friendship would be just like any other …show more content…
She taught me that if I could not open the can of spaghetti sauce it was not because I was a weak female, it was because I was weak. Her values became engraved in me and I think they show most in issues like the one on the bus when I find my thoughts to be so different from someone else. Those values from my mother make me question every time I hear someone claim racism. Did that white girl just walk by without saying “Hi” because you are black or because you were playing on your iPhone, had a sour look on your face, and your arms crossed? Would the situation be different had you looked up, unfolded your arms, and smiled at her? Calling racism when it is not applicable just fuels racism. It comes to a point where as a white person I truly dread interacting with a black person I do not know for fear of accidentally coming off as “racist”. My mother taught me that it should not be that way. We should not have to dance around our words and avoid situations in fear of insulting someone even if your intentions were never

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