Theme Of Man's Inhumanities To Man

Improved Essays
My Essay A theme found commonly throughout history is “man’s inhumanities to man”. This theme was especially present in the nineteenth-century in the South, with whites treating blacks extremely poorly and depriving blacks of social and economic opportunities and successes and dealing with police violence. In Richard Wright’s Black Boy this theme is explored through Richard’s struggles to work and adapt in a racist southern society. Throughout Richard Wright’s novel Black Boy Richard learns the harsh ways of southern society through rough encounters with whites. Richard displays what he has learned about southern life when he proclaims “I could calculate my chances for life in the South as a Negro fairly clearly now. I could fight the southern whites… But I knew that I could never win… They were strong and we were weak” (Wright 252). After many years of struggling to understand his role in southern society Richard finally recognizes the tragic fate of seemingly every black stuck in the southern culture would eventually suffer. He realizes that there was no chance for success because of his skin color. This lamentable fate is shared by all blacks in their society. In Richard’s view he could never beat …show more content…
Blacks in Richard’s time period feared corrupt cops and what they might do to them, sadly many people still fear this in today’s society. Many young blacks are afraid of cops for good reason “the results show that black youths were nine times likelier — instead of 21 times likelier — to be killed by police than young white people” (Katel). This alarming statistic displays the fears of black communities to be a reality. Every day, young blacks are subjected to police brutality and fear the people who are supposed to be protecting them. Some fatal shootings of young blacks have caused outrage and riots all over the

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Blacks weren 't allowed certain jobs, homes, and common rights that a white man is given. White men always saw them as wanting to rape or go after white women. Racism is a common threat anywhere in the world still to this day. It causes many wars and fights; it is an idea that lowers the value of the African American race. The Scottsboro case was during the Great Depression; it is a supreme example of how blacks were treated.…

    • 1117 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    I learned a lot about the true hardships of the oppressed blacks in the South and about the many conflicts that kept them from stepping up in the South as true equals. The book was meant to be from his experience but more outtakes from other observers of the problems of race in the South would have helped his…

    • 737 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Whereas, the freedmen’s power in society are completely in the hands of the other people. He also discusses the aftermath of the Civil War in the South, stating that everything was ruined; politically, socially and economically as well. The personal lives of many of the Southern people was hard because they do not have slaves to maintain their land and the transition between slavery and free labor will be difficult because of the fact that the only type of labor system Southerners have are known as slavery. After the Fourteenth amendment passed, the freedmen enjoyed to the fullest but white southerners created obstacles in the way. Andrew Johnson, a deeply racist politician whose conception of democracy was limited to the white population and who ended up opening the door to the Southern Black Codes of 1865-66, which attempted to return blacks to a condition close to slavery (Foner).…

    • 1105 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As a black man Griffin experienced first hand injustice, bullying, and the need to fight for blacks rights on behalf of their unfair treatment. Though it is very apparent to many in the novel and in Ferguson that blacks seem to have an “inferior status” we are all the same, black or…

    • 1167 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The narrator in Ellison’s short story does indeed suffers a great deal. The horrific treatment that he deals with in order to perform his task is symbolic. It represents the many hardships that African Americans had to deal with back then. Blacks had to adhere to white society, and where led to believe that if they obeyed, they would fit in. Any blacks that tried to stand up for their rights were generally killed by anti-hate groups or the Ku Klux Klan.…

    • 1254 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Oppression, regardless of whichever form or degree inflicted, often leaves devastating effects on its victims. Ernest Gaines ' novel A Lesson Before Dying portrays a manner of oppression through Gaines ' chosen setting of the prejudiced south during the 1940 's. The story revolves around the interaction of the main characters: Grant Wiggins, a teacher, and Jefferson, an African American man sentenced to death after being falsely convicted of a crime. A Lesson Before Dying is told through Wiggins ' perspective as the teacher tries to enforce dignity and self-worth into Jefferson before he dies. The author uses Jefferson, Matthew Antoine, and Grant Wiggins to reveal to his audience that racism is an oppressive force.…

    • 1238 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “Is Racism a Permanent Feature of American Society?” takes the reader into a deep debate between two scholars. Derrick Bell believes racism will be an everlasting problem faced by African Americans in our society; and Dinesh D’Souza believes the exact opposite. He believes other factors occurring in the society affects blacks and the problems they hold racism accountable for. Derrick Bell argues his point by starting off addressing slavery. He states, “Slavery has left a significant portion of the race ‘with life-long poverty and soul-devastating despair..” (173).…

    • 1085 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Reading the book, The New Jim Crow: Mass incarceration in the age of colorblindness brought attention to several different injustices that minorities face daily. It shuns light on how the African American community has been stereotyped and systematically program to dismantle the African American male figure within the family dynamics. According to Michelle Alexander Obama stated that too many fathers are AWOL, MIA and neglecting their responsibilities, which had cause the family to be weaker (Alexander, 2010,p ). However with the system continuously oppressing the African American male this is yet another way to belittle and emasculate this population. African American males are the prime focus of incarceration with African American women not being far behind ().…

    • 1319 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    You made me a killer,” This is the perspective of black teen of how “White America” portrays black men. Lamar is saying society views black males to be violent. “Reciprocation of freedom only live in your eyes. You hate me don’t you?” He is saying that not everyone is not equal and racism is still existent. Lamar then goes into speaking of how the black community has issues within themselves they have to figure out.…

    • 1839 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Correspondingly, in Robert Paul Lamb’s essay, “‘A Little Yellow Bastard Boy’: Paternal Rejection, Filial Insistence, and the Triumph of African American Cultural Aesthetics in Langston Hughes 's ‘Mulatto,’” he writes about the struggles of a mixed race person. He claims that “the figure of the light-skinned, biracial person who is never fully accepted, or able to accept himself, as either black or white—a figure who in the nineteenth century was termed ‘the tragic mulatto’” (Lamb 134). Essentially what Lamb is saying is what is reflected throughout all of the African American literature, both in stories and poems. Racism in society caused a great divide between white and black people, there are numerous struggles for the two groups but one could find belonging by identifying with one or the other. However, for mixed individuals, those who are both black and white but at the same time neither, there is not true place of belonging because the group will accept one side, whether it is black or white, and scorn the other.…

    • 1038 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays